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I am just starting using three.js. I have assembled a test using pieces of code I've found on three.js main website.

I have a bunch of geometries (spheres) representing particles which positions are changed inside a loop, according to an equation I made. I tried to render each iteration through this kind of code:

function simulate() {
    for (var j = 0 ; j < Nb ; j++ ) {           
        // update the geometries positions
        ...
        render();
    }
}

but the rendering was not done, instead it was performed after going through all the iterations, when entering the animate function, called after simulate

function animate() {
    render();
    requestAnimationFrame( animate );
}

Actually the rendering would happen if I was going step by step in the javascript console of my chrome browser.

So I tried to change my code so that I could use requestAnimationFrame inside my loop, that way:

function simulate() {
    for (var j = 0 ; j < Nb ; j++ ) {           
        this.internalRenderingLoop = function() {
            // update the objects shapes and locations
            ...
            render();
            requestAnimationFrame( this.internalRenderingLoop );
        }
    }
}

but it did not work either. I also apparently have a conflict between both calls of requestAnimationFrame leading to Uncaught Error: TYPE_MISMATCH_ERR: DOM Exception 17

So the question is: is there a way to force the rendering at each iteration in my simulate function or do I need to refactor my code so that each call to update the geometries positions is made in the animate or render function?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your last function is nearly there. In your for loop, you are just overwriting the internalrendering loop function without it getting a change to execute. Also if you are using the j variable in your shape update code, you need to increment it a bit differently. How about something like this (untested, but you get the idea):

var j = 0; // need to be outside function to have proper scope
function simulate() {
  j++;
  if (j == Nb) { return; } // stop

  // update the objects shapes and locations

  render();
  requestAnimationFrame(simulate);      
}

You won't need animate() function at all because you are already doing the animating in simulate().

Your simulation speed will also depend on framerate, so to have more control on simulation speed you can replace the last line of function with something like:

window.setTimeout( function() { requestAnimationFrame(simulate); }, 1000 / 25);

This should run it approximately at 25 FPS.

share|improve this answer
    
Can I still use animate though? Because I'd like to be able to rotate around the final result of the simulation, using mouse movements. –  RockridgeKid Dec 11 '12 at 8:12
    
i think it would be best to have everything in the same rendering loop function, whatever it's called (animate or simulate, doesn't matter). you could move the simulation code to your animate(), and instead of if (j == Nb) { return; } do if (j < Nb) { // your simulation shape update code } –  yaku Dec 11 '12 at 8:22
    
alright! It works better that way. Thanks. –  RockridgeKid Dec 11 '12 at 22:33

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