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I'm new to OOP terminology, I am trying to create a class that make a hit counter.

I try the code below but it create just a counter.txt page with inside value 1. I dont know why its not incrementing.

class LOGFILE {
    public function READ($FileName) {
        $handle = fopen($FileName, 'r');
        $fread = file_get_contents($FileName);
        return $fread;
        fclose($handle);
    }
    public function WRITE($FileName, $FileData) {
        $handle = fopen($FileName, 'w');
        $FileData = $fread +1;
        fwrite($handle, $FileData);
        fclose($handle);
    }
}
$logfile = new LOGFILE();

$logfile -> WRITE("counter.txt",$FileData);

echo $logfile -> READ("counter.txt");
share|improve this question
1  
Please use PascalCase for class, also there is no $FileData –  Jonathan de M. Dec 11 '12 at 7:39
1  
This code is a perfect example of a file access race condition. This counter will frequently corrupt itself and inaccurately count new hits. The file should be kept locked throughout the read/write process. –  Charles Dec 11 '12 at 7:44
    
Why the spaces around ->? Doesn't this code throw any error? –  this.lau_ Dec 11 '12 at 7:45
2  
@Laurent It won't throw any error. Still awful to read. –  Leri Dec 11 '12 at 7:49
1  
Will fclose($handle) execute after a return in the READ function? I was of the belief that return is a final statement in a function. All code after a return point is excluded. –  SnapGravy Dec 11 '12 at 7:58
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The reason is that $fread is local variable for both READ and WRITE methods. You need to make it private global variable for your class:

class LOGFILE {
    private $fread;

    public function READ($FileName) {
        $this->fread = file_get_contents($FileName);
        return $this->fread; 
    }
    public function WRITE($FileName) {
            $this->READ($FileName);
        $handle = fopen($FileName, 'w');
        $FileData = $this->fread +1;
        fwrite($handle, $FileData);
        fclose($handle);
    }
}
$logfile = new LOGFILE();

$logfile -> WRITE("counter.txt");

echo $logfile -> READ("counter.txt");

Note: I have removed fopen and fclose because file_get_contents does not need it. In write you can use file_put_contents. Removed not used variable $FileData too. It's always a good practice to create variables methods and classes when they are needed.

Also take a look at best practices how to name your classes, variables, methods and so on. Here's best guide, IMO.

share|improve this answer
    
it also do not increment value, it just create file with value 1 –  Arif Dec 11 '12 at 7:51
1  
Shouldn't you do READ, WRITE, READ in order to increment the counter? Otherwise fread is just set to 0+1 when you increment it. –  this.lau_ Dec 11 '12 at 7:53
    
@Laurent Yes. Edited answer. thank you. –  Leri Dec 11 '12 at 7:55
1  
@Arif I've edited answer. –  Leri Dec 11 '12 at 7:55
    
@PLB you are a great man, thanks for helping me :) –  Arif Dec 11 '12 at 7:57
show 1 more comment

Let's start going over the corrected code and see what was missing:

<?php

class LOGFILE {

    public function READ($FileName) {
        $handle = fopen($FileName, 'r');
        $fread = fgets($handle, 8192);
        fclose($handle);
        return $fread;        
    }

    public function WRITE($FileName, $FileData) {        
        $counter = $this->READ($FileName);        
        $handle = fopen($FileName, 'w');        
        fwrite($handle, $FileData + $counter);
        fclose($handle);
    }
}
$logfile = new LOGFILE();
$FileData = 1;
$logfile -> WRITE("counter.txt",$FileData);
echo $logfile -> READ("counter.txt")."\n";
$logfile -> WRITE("counter.txt",$FileData);
echo $logfile -> READ("counter.txt")."\n";

?>
  1. use of fgets instead of file_get_contents in READ (you can choose to use file_get_contents but I rather stay consistent with the other function that uses fopen)
  2. use of READ inside function WRITE (the principal of code-reuse)
  3. open of file with write permissions in WRITE: 'w'
  4. init $FileData = 1;
  5. no need to hold a private member: $fread
  6. most important: do not write statements after return (like you did in READ) - statements that are written after return will not be executed!

This solution was tested successfully.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a million for that, i want to ask what is 8192 in line $fread = fgets($handle, 8192); –  Arif Dec 11 '12 at 8:13
    
it's the size of the buffer (in bytes, default is 1024) you're using in order to read the file –  alfasin Dec 11 '12 at 8:14
    
first time when we run this script it gives error bcuz it request $counter = $this->READ($FileName); before counter.txt creation. Is it possible to remove this error –  Arif Dec 11 '12 at 8:45
    
I couldn't reproduce it - but you can add a check, and if $this->READ($FileName); returns FALSE init counter to 1 –  alfasin Dec 11 '12 at 15:59
add comment

OOP must be used where it's needed. You need a simple thing so, no need of OOP.

<?php

function addValue($file='counter.txt', $amount=1) {
    if( false == is_file($file) ) {
        return false;
    }
    $initial = file_get_contents($file);
    return @file_put_contents($initial+$amount);
}

addValue();

?>

Test your OOP knowledge on something complex, like a shopping cart or some other concept.

EDIT // so, if you need a simple example that looks complex, here you go :)

<?php

class log {

    public $file = '';
    private $amount = 0;

    public function __construct( $file ) {
        $this->file = $file;
        $this->amount = 1;
    }

    public function makeAdd() {
        $initial = file_get_contents($this->file);
        return @file_put_contents($this->file, $initial + $this->amount);
    }

    function __call($f, $args) {
        switch( $f ) {
            case 'add':
                if(isset($args[0]) && !empty($args[0])) {
                    $this->amount = (int)$args[0];
                }
                if( $this->amount == 0 ) {
                    throw new Exception('Not a valid amount.');
                }
                return $this->makeAdd();
            break;
        }
    } 

}

try {

    // create log
    $L = new log('count.txt');

    // this will add 2
    var_dump($L->add(2));

    // this will also add 2
    var_dump($L->add());

    // until you rewrite the amount
    var_dump($L->add(1));

    // final result -> 5

} catch(Exception $e) {
    die($e->getMessage());
}

?>

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
i can do it with simple function like how you do that, but i'm learning OOP so can you help me in my code :) –  Arif Dec 11 '12 at 7:49
add comment

You can create a static counter and increment it each time (instead of create file)

<?php
class CountClass {
    public static $counter = 0;

    function __construct() {
        self::$counter++;
    }
}

new CountClass();
new CountClass();


echo CountClass::$counter;
?>
share|improve this answer
    
i can create with simple function also, but i'm learning oop. So can you please take a look at my code. Thank you for your reply :) –  Arif Dec 11 '12 at 7:44
    
is above code is not OOP ? –  Nirav Ranpara Dec 11 '12 at 7:44
2  
And that won't work anyway since the counter won't persist from one request to another. –  this.lau_ Dec 11 '12 at 7:44
    
@Nirav Ranpara its OOP and your code is also not working. I need to create .txt file for some purpose –  Arif Dec 11 '12 at 7:47
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