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I have this time stamp format for each car in my map:

2012-12-11T03:51:43+03:00

I want to extract the number of hours from it according to current time.

I don't know how to parse this string then compare it to current time.

Any Idea ?

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Just to add to Yoshi's answer, you might look at using a library like MomentJS for the parsing part, since even IE8 won't parse that string. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 11 '12 at 9:21

3 Answers 3

something like:

var
  d1 = new Date('2012-12-11T03:51:43+03:00'),
  d2 = new Date;

console.log(
  (d2 - d1) / 3600000
);
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@ Yoshi: No, actually, since you're doing the date math, it'll using milliseconds-since-the-epoch and the timezones should fall out. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 11 '12 at 9:05
    
But do beware that not all browsers support parsing that date string. That format was only introduced in ES5 (so, about three years ago) and doesn't work on older browsers. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 11 '12 at 9:06
    
@T.J.Crowder ok, that may be for I did only check chrome. –  Yoshi Dec 11 '12 at 9:06
    
Could be fixed with some regex find/replace. –  Salman A Dec 11 '12 at 9:10
    
@SalmanA: No, you'd be better off properly parsing it. If you do the regex thing, you'll A) be off into unspecified territory, and B) probably be working in the local timezone (again, though unspecified). –  T.J. Crowder Dec 11 '12 at 9:10

You need to first fix the timestamp for other browsers than Chrome

javascript date.parse difference in chrome and other browsers

DEMO

var noOffset = function(s) {
  var day= s.slice(0,-5).split(/\D/).map(function(itm){
    return parseInt(itm, 10) || 0;
  });
  day[1]-= 1;
  day= new Date(Date.UTC.apply(Date, day));  
  var offsetString = s.slice(-5)
  var offset = parseInt(offsetString,10)/100;
  if (offsetString.slice(0,1)=="+") offset*=-1;
  day.setHours(day.getHours()+offset);
  return day.getTime();
}
alert(parseInt((new Date().getTime()-noOffset(yourTimeStamp))/3600000))
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function Date_ISO8601(dateString) {
    /*
     * Works by transforming hour and minutes:
     * 2012-12-11T16:30:00+05:30 becomes 2012, 12, 11, 11, 00, 00
     * 2012-12-11T16:00:00+05:00 becomes 2012, 12, 11, 11, 00, 00
     * 2012-12-11T07:30:00-03:30 becomes 2012, 12, 11, 10, 60, 00
     * 2012-12-11T03:00:00-08:00 becomes 2012, 12, 11, 11, 00, 00
     * 2012-12-11T01:00:00-10:00 becomes 2012, 12, 11, 11, 00, 00
     * 2012-12-10T23:00:00-12:00 becomes 2012, 12, 10, 35, 00, 00
     */
    var dateParts = dateString.match(/(....)-(..)-(..)T(..):(..):(..)(.)(..):(..)/);
    dateParts[4] -= (dateParts[7] + "1") * dateParts[8];
    dateParts[5] -= (dateParts[7] + "1") * dateParts[9];
    return new Date(Date.UTC(+dateParts[1], dateParts[2] - 1, +dateParts[3], dateParts[4], dateParts[5], +dateParts[6]));
}
var d1 = new Date_ISO8601("2012-12-11T03:51:43+03:00");
var d2 = new Date;
console.log((d2 - d1) / 3600000);
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