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Is it possible for something like this to exist?

template<int Channel>
void deduce_mask(Matrix const &src, int mask[])
{
    //I hope i could become a constant and the compiler would unroll the loop at compile time        
    for(int i = Channel; i != -1; --i)
    {            
        //mapper is a helper class which translate two and three dimension into one dimension index
        //constexpr makes it possible to find out the index at compile time
        mask[mapper(0, 1, i)] = src(row - 1, col)[i];
        mask[mapper(1, 1, i)] = src(row, col)[i];
        mask[mapper(2, 1, i)] = src(row + 1, col)[i];    
    }
}

instead of

template<int Channel>
class deduceMask
{
public:
    static void deduce_mask(matrix const &src, int mask[]);
};

template<int Channel>
void deduce_mask(matrix const &src, int mask[])
{                
    mask[mapper(0, 1, Channel)] = src(row - 1, col)[Channel];
    mask[mapper(1, 1, Channel)] = src(row, col)[Channel];
    mask[mapper(2, 1, Channel)] = src(row + 1, col)[Channel];    

    deduceMask<Channel - 1>::deduce_mask(src, mask);
}

template<>
class deduceMask<-1>
{
public:
    static void deduce_mask(matrix const &src, int mask[])
    {

    }
};

The second solution is the only solution I could come up of when I want the compiler to figure out the result at compile time.Do I have an easy way to make the "i" become constant value like the metaprogramming solution?For me, a simple for loop is much more easier to work with rather than the metaprogramming version.

Sorry for my poor English, I hope I explain my problem properly.

share|improve this question
2  
You could also write it recursively and use constexpr, if you prefer that type of syntax? –  Agentlien Dec 11 '12 at 9:10
    
I tried to make a constexpr version but failed, constexpr only allow one return statement. –  StereoMatching Dec 11 '12 at 9:37
3  
I'm fairly certain that most modern compilers do this optimization automatically, much like they do it for for loops until a constant value (e.g. for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++)). You'd have to check to be sure though. –  ShdNx Dec 11 '12 at 10:10
    
Then I should learn how to set the optimization flags of the compiler when this become the bottleneck of my program –  StereoMatching Dec 11 '12 at 12:17
    
It's entirely possible to unroll that code at compile time, although my particular findings are that MSVC can do that already and often results in better machine code since it has more context –  K-ballo Jan 9 '13 at 23:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Template metaprogramming in C++ is pure functional programming, and in pure functional programming you don't get to use loops like for or while and you don't get to have any mutable data at all. All you have is recursion. To make working with recursion easier, you need to rise abstraction level a bit. The recursive code that you have is fine, but the iteration and work can be split apart:

template <int First, int Last>
struct static_for
{
    template <typename Fn>
    void operator()(Fn const& fn) const
    {
        if (First < Last)
        {
            fn(First);
            static_for<First+1, Last>()(fn);
        }
    }
};

template <int N>
struct static_for<N, N>
{
    template <typename Fn>
    void operator()(Fn const& fn) const
    { }
};

Now that you have this meta-function, you can write your deduce_mask function like this:

template<int Channel>
void deduce_mask(Matrix const &src, int mask[])
{
    static_for<0, Channel>()([&](int i)
    {            
        mask[mapper(0, 1, i)] = src(row - 1, col)[i];
        mask[mapper(1, 1, i)] = src(row, col)[i];
        mask[mapper(2, 1, i)] = src(row + 1, col)[i];    
    });
}

Visual C++ 2012 with /Ob1 command line switch compiles this code into this:

push        0  
call        <lambda_7588286c1d4f3efe98a2e307bd757f8e>::operator() (010C1270h)  
push        1  
call        <lambda_7588286c1d4f3efe98a2e307bd757f8e>::operator() (010C1270h)  
push        2  
call        <lambda_7588286c1d4f3efe98a2e307bd757f8e>::operator() (010C1270h)  
push        3  
call        <lambda_7588286c1d4f3efe98a2e307bd757f8e>::operator() (010C1270h)  
push        4  
call        <lambda_7588286c1d4f3efe98a2e307bd757f8e>::operator() (010C1270h)  
...

If you can't use lambda functions, you need to write a functor. Functor has one advantage over lambda function - you can specify a calling convention (if you don't mind doing that). If the operator() of the functor has __fastcall calling convention then you will see mov edx, x instead of push x in the assembler code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this answer is pretty elegant(at least for me) –  StereoMatching Feb 7 '13 at 15:26
    
But aren't all those calls slower than having a normal for loop? Why doesn't the compiler optimize them away? –  Kapichu Sep 30 '14 at 15:11

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