Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the typical problem with big int decoded with json_decode and try using the JSON_BIGINT_AS_STRING option, but it seems that php ignores the parameter.

I tried the php.net example code:

$json = '12345678901234567890';

var_dump(json_decode($json));
var_dump(json_decode($json, false, 512, JSON_BIGINT_AS_STRING));

The output should be:

float(1.2345678901235E+19)
string(20) "12345678901234567890"

But in my server (xampp php 5.4.7) I have:

float(1.2345678901235E+19)
float(1.2345678901235E+19)

Thanks for the help!

share|improve this question
    
JSON_BIGINT_AS_STRING it is by default used by json_decode(). –  anuj arora Dec 11 '12 at 9:46
    
@anujarora no it isn't... "Currently only JSON_BIGINT_AS_STRING is supported (default is to cast large integers as floats)" –  Matt Humphrey Dec 11 '12 at 9:48
1  
I think it's happening because '12345678901234567890' isn't in JSON format. $json = '{"key":12345678901234567890}'; < that returns as expected.... object(stdClass)#1 (1) { ["key"]=> float(1.2345678901235E+19) } object(stdClass)#1 (1) { ["key"]=> string(20) "12345678901234567890" } –  Matt Humphrey Dec 11 '12 at 9:50
1  
Are you sure you're using PHP 5.4.7 on the server that gives you a float? Because the options parameter in json_decode was only added in PHP 5.4.0 and I'm not sure if you're saying you have one server running 5.4.7 or both? Can you please make this clear? –  GoogleGuy Dec 11 '12 at 10:07
1  
@deceze Yes, I just realized the example in the documentation is demonstrating the wrong use of the function option. That's not what that option is for. It's for when you have an object or array with a large integer property that is too big to fit as type int in PHP and you want it decoded as a string. Of course decoding a JSON string in PHP is just a string in PHP. It won't cast it to int or anything. I fixed the example in the documentation, by the way. –  GoogleGuy Dec 11 '12 at 10:32
show 12 more comments

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

EDIT:

I had to confirm this, but this behavior has been classified as a bug in PHP. Please see the bug report for more details.

The existing behavior causes your string to be cast as int/float (number type) internally by PHP. If you provide a JSON encoded object, array, or string the function does what it describes, but for now this reflects the buggy behavior.

$json = '12345678901234567890';

var_dump(json_decode($json));           /* float(1.2345678901235E+19) */
var_dump(json_decode($json, false, 512, 
         JSON_BIGINT_AS_STRING));       /* float(1.2345678901235E+19) */

As you can see both give us a float, but when we use a valid JSON object, array, or valid JSON as a string we get the expected result.

$jsonStr = '"12345678901234567890"';        // as a string
$jsonArr = '[12345678901234567890]';        // as an array
$jsonObj = '{"num":12345678901234567890}';  // as an object

var_dump(
         json_decode($jsonStr), /* It's JSON_BIGINT_AS_STRING by default in 5.4 */
         json_decode($jsonArr),
         json_decode($jsonArr, false, 512, JSON_BIGINT_AS_STRING),
         json_decode($jsonObj),
         json_decode($jsonObj, false, 512, JSON_BIGINT_AS_STRING)
);

The output looks like the following...

string(20) "12345678901234567890"
array(1) {
  [0]=>
  float(1.2345678901235E+19)
}
array(1) {
  [0]=>
  string(20) "12345678901234567890"
}
object(stdClass)#1 (1) {
  ["num"]=>
  float(1.2345678901235E+19)
}
object(stdClass)#2 (1) {
  ["num"]=>
  string(20) "12345678901234567890"
}

This should be fixed soon, but for now I just wanted to update my answer to reflect this new information.

share|improve this answer
    
Fixed on bugs.php.net thanks @GoogleGuy –  EduBusquets Dec 11 '12 at 18:09
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.