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I am currently using guid NEWID() but I know it is not cryptographically secure.

Is there any better way of generating a cryptographically secure number in SQL Server?

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@Endri Can you clarify what you found lacking? CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM looks like a perfectly fine answer. –  CodesInChaos Feb 6 '13 at 15:24
    
@CodesInChaos CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM doesn't generate exactly numbers.. Of course you can convert them to Int, but will the length be the one required? For instance, If i need to generate 8-digit cryptographically secure numbers, how can I use CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM? Also, are they unique? –  Endri Feb 6 '13 at 15:53
    
Moreover I'm curious about any other way of generating secure numbers in SQL. –  Endri Feb 6 '13 at 15:59
5  
I doubt you'll find a better answer than the one given by Martin Smith as generating anything securely is hard, and CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM would appear to be purpose-built for the job. If you're really interested you could perhaps look at RFC2898 and use HASHBYTES to build the key derivation function. –  chrisb Feb 7 '13 at 13:56
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2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Interesting question :)

I think this will work: CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM

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Oh, this is even usable as a random number source! Random numbers are tedious in SQL Server. –  usr Dec 11 '12 at 9:56
    
I aslo need it to be unique. Can I use Convert(int, CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(9, Convert(varbinary, NEWID()))) ? –  user1761123 Dec 11 '12 at 10:07
    
@user1761123 - maybe if you could put all of your requirements into your question, people might have a chance of answering it. So far, it appears it needs to be unique and of int size. Now, what definition of "cryptographically secure" do you want us to use? Is this to be e.g. a nonce? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Dec 11 '12 at 11:52
    
I am generating forms and each form must have its own verification code, so that the user can verify its authenticity by pasting the verification code in a TextBox (that's why I thought int was suitable). I don't really have any other reqirements –  user1761123 Dec 11 '12 at 12:14
    
@user1761123: Why does it have to be unique then? –  leppie Dec 11 '12 at 12:16
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CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM is documented to return a "cryptographic random number".

It takes a length parameter between 1 and 8000 which is the length of the number to return in bytes.

For lengths <= 8 bytes. This can be cast to one of the SQL Server integer types straightforwardly.

+-----------+------------------+---------+
| Data type |      Range       | Storage |
+-----------+------------------+---------+
| bigint    | -2^63 to 2^63-1  | 8 Bytes |
| int       | -2^31 to 2^31-1  | 4 Bytes |
| smallint  | -2^15 to 2^15-1  | 2 Bytes |
| tinyint   | 0 to 255         | 1 Byte  |
+-----------+------------------+---------+

Three of them are signed integers and one unsigned. The following will each use the full range of their respective datatypes.

SELECT 
      CAST(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(1)  AS TINYINT),
      CAST(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(2)  AS SMALLINT),
      CAST(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(4)  AS INT),
      CAST(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(8)  AS BIGINT)

It is also possible to supply a shorter value than the datatype storage.

SELECT CAST(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(3)  AS INT)

In this case only positive numbers can be returned. The sign bit will always be 0 as the last byte is treated as 0x00. The range of possible numbers that can be returned by the above is between 0 and POWER(2, 24) - 1 inclusive.

Suppose the requirement is to generate some random number between 1 and 250.

One possible way of doing it would be

SELECT  ( 1 + CAST(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(1)  AS TINYINT) % 250) AS X
INTO #T
FROM master..spt_values V1,  master..spt_values

However this method has a problem.

SELECT COUNT(*),X
FROM #T
GROUP BY X
ORDER BY X 

The first ten rows of results are

+-------+----+
| Count | X  |
+-------+----+
| 49437 |  1 |
| 49488 |  2 |
| 49659 |  3 |
| 49381 |  4 |
| 49430 |  5 |
| 49356 |  6 |
| 24914 |  7 |
| 24765 |  8 |
| 24513 |  9 |
| 24732 | 10 |
+-------+----+

Lower numbers (in this case 1 -6) are generated twice as regularly as the others because there are two possible inputs to the modulus function that can generate each of those results.

One possible solution would be to discard all numbers >= 250

UPDATE #T
SET    X = CASE
             WHEN Random >= 250 THEN NULL
             ELSE ( 1 + Random % 250 )
           END 
FROM #T
CROSS APPLY (SELECT CAST(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(1) AS TINYINT)) CA (Random)

This appears to work on my machine but it is probably not guaranteed that SQL Server will only evaluate the function once across both references to Random in the CASE expression. Additionally it still leaves the problem of needing second and subsequent passes to fix up the NULL rows where the random value was discarded.

Declaring a scalar UDF can solve both those issues.

/*Work around as can't call CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM from a UDF directly*/
CREATE VIEW dbo.CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM1 
AS
SELECT CAST(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(1) AS TINYINT) AS Random

go


CREATE FUNCTION GET_CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM1()
RETURNS TINYINT
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @Result TINYINT

    WHILE (@Result IS NULL OR @Result >= 250)
            /*Not initialised or result to be discarded*/
        SELECT @Result = Random FROM dbo.CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM1 

    RETURN @Result

END

And then

UPDATE #T
SET    X  = dbo.GET_CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM1()

Alternatively and more straight forwardly one could simply use

CAST(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(8)  AS BIGINT) % 250

On the grounds that the range of bigint is so huge that any bias will likely be insignificant. There are 73,786,976,294,838,208 ways that 1 can be generated and 73,786,976,294,838,206 that 249 can be from the query above.

If even that small possible bias is not permitted you could discard any values NOT BETWEEN -9223372036854775750 AND 9223372036854775749 as shown earlier.

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