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I have the following function:

ItemSet* Library::itemsForKeyword(const string& keyword)
{
    ItemSet temp;

    for(it=bookList.begin();it!=bookList.end();it++){
        if(it->getPtr()->findKeyWord(it->getPtr()->keywordsList, keyword))
            temp.insert(*it);
    }

    ItemSet* temp2 = &temp;
    return temp2;
}

ItemSet is a set which contains instances of ItemPtr, which contains pointers to instances of derived classes. 'it' is an iterator defined in Library, findKeyWord is a function that compares the keywordsList to the keyword to determine if that keyword is in that list. if it returns true, then I dereference the iterator, and add the instance it is currently iterating to temp. My issue is, when it is done with the loop, I return the temp2, but it returns empty, and causes an error when my print function goes to print it. Why is it returning empty? Thanks.

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5  
temp gets destroyed where the scope ends. The returned pointer is called dangling after that... –  neagoegab Dec 11 '12 at 10:05

4 Answers 4

You're returning a pointer to the local object which gets destroyed on returning from the function. That is surely undefined behavior.

Also, I don't see why you need to return pointer. You could return the object itself:

ItemSet Library::itemsForKeyword(const string& keyword)
{
   ItemSet temp;
   //your code
   return temp;
}

If you need to return pointer, then I would suggest you to return smart pointer, rather than raw pointer.

std::unique_ptr<ItemSet> Library::itemsForKeyword(const string& keyword)
{
   std::unique_ptr<ItemSet> temp(new ItemSet());
   //your code, use this syntax =>  temp->insert(*it);
   return std::move(temp);
}
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I need to return the pointer, because main is defined in a way that is not allowed to be changed per the instructor. We were given a 'skeleton' to insert our code into, this function was empty and I was to fill it in, so I don't think I can change anything but write the code inside. So I do need to return the pointer, but not sure if I can use a raw pointer. Is there any other way? –  Ian Lindquist Dec 11 '12 at 10:20
1  
@IanLindquist: If you're not allowed to use smart pointer either, then you have to stick with ItemSet *temp = new ItemSet(), then insert data to it as temp->insert(*it), then return temp;. But remember, once you're done with the returned pointer, you've to manually do delete returnedPtr; to deallocate the memory. –  Nawaz Dec 11 '12 at 10:24
1  
that simple fix did the trick. Thanks, not sure how I missed that. –  Ian Lindquist Dec 11 '12 at 10:27
1  
If you are going to use move semantics then just make ItemSet movable and move that. If it's just a typedef of an STL collection then it should already be movable. –  CashCow Dec 11 '12 at 10:27

You are returning the address of a local variable, this will not work.

Either supply an item as an argument to the function which you modify or allocate an item in your function and return its address.

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After you comment with instructor, and main code...

ItemSet* Library::itemsForKeyword(const string& keyword)
{
    ItemSet* p_temp = new ItemSet;

    for(it=bookList.begin();it!=bookList.end();it++){
        if(it->getPtr()->findKeyWord(it->getPtr()->keywordsList, keyword))
            p_temp->insert(*it);
    }

    return p_temp;
}

EDIT: you should show to your instructor @Nawaz example :)

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You must not return addresses of objects allocated on stack. After the function returns the objects on the stack are destroyed and the pointer is pointing to some garbage.

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