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Let's say I got the following Entity Framework "Ruimte" model:

public class Ruimte
{
    #region Constructor

    public Ruimte()
    {
        Kenmerken = new List<Kenmerk>();
    }

    #endregion

    #region Properties

    [Key]
    public int Id
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    [Required]
    public string Naam
    {
        get;
        set;
    }


    public List<Kenmerk> Kenmerken
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    #endregion
}

And the "Kenmerk" model looks the following:

public class Kenmerk
{
    #region Properties

    [Key]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public KenmerkOptie KenmerkOptie
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    [Required]
    public int KenmerkOptieId
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    [Required]
    public string Waarde
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    [Required]
    public int RuimteId
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    #endregion
}

And in my Ruimte/Create view there are 2 fields for adding a "Kenmerk". Now a "Kenmerk" can't go into the database without having a KenmerkOptieId or Waarde. So the view will reject the submit everytime I try to post the form because of the validation. Though I want a "Ruimte" to have or not to have a "Kenmerk".

So the solution I went for was having a "RuimteCreateViewModel" with the properties "Name" which was required and a list of the another copmlex class called "KenmerkCreateViewModel". Now in this last viewmodel the KenmerkOptieId and the Waarde are not required so I finally CAN submit the form.

Though I don't think this is the best solution of "skipping" the required field validators. So what is your "best practice" when the database validation is different from the view validation?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think xVal - a validation framework for ASP.NET MVC, see http://blog.stevensanderson.com/2009/01/10/xval-a-validation-framework-for-aspnet-mvc/ is very useful for the entity framework model that you are trying to develop. Especially the use of enforcing server-side validation, it allows you to choose to validate simple property formatting rules during property setters. See http://blog.stevensanderson.com/2008/09/08/thoughts-on-validation-in-aspnet-mvc-applications/ for an explanation.

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The links you provided look great, I'll look into them some further before accepting the question. Thanks for your response and I'll come back to let you know if this is what I'm looking for. –  Julian Dec 11 '12 at 10:51

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