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Suppose I have a set {a, b, c, d}. I want to create a "path" from it, which is a generator that yields (a, b), then (b, c), then (c, d) (of course set is unordered, so any other path through the elements is acceptable).

What is the best way to do this?

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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's an example using the pairwise() recipe from http://docs.python.org/3/library/itertools.html#itertools-recipes

>>> from itertools import tee
>>> def pairwise(iterable):
...     "s -> (s0,s1), (s1,s2), (s2, s3), ..."
...     a, b = tee(iterable)
...     next(b, None)
...     return zip(a, b)
...
>>> for pair in pairwise({1, 2, 3, 4}):
...     print(pair)
...
(1, 2)
(2, 3)
(3, 4)
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def gen(seq):
   it = iter(seq)
   a, b = next(it), next(it)
   while True:
     yield (a, b)
     a, b = b, next(it)

print(list(gen({1, 2, 3, 4})))
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1  
You should always use next(it) as iterators are not guaranteed to have a next method; in Python 3 (which this question is about) this fails. –  poke Dec 11 '12 at 12:33
    
@poke: Didn't know that, thanks. Fixed. –  NPE Dec 11 '12 at 12:38
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Use the Rolling or sliding window iterator in Python solution:

>>> from itertools import islice
>>> def window(seq, n=2):
...     "Returns a sliding window (of width n) over data from the iterable"
...     "   s -> (s0,s1,...s[n-1]), (s1,s2,...,sn), ...                   "
...     it = iter(seq)
...     result = tuple(islice(it, n))
...     if len(result) == n:
...         yield result    
...     for elem in it:
...         result = result[1:] + (elem,)
...         yield result
... 
>>> path = window({1, 2, 3, 4})
>>> for step in gen:
...     print path
(1, 2)
(2, 3)
(3, 4)

This happens to follow sorted order, because for python integers hash(x) == x and thus the sequence of 1, 2, 3, 4 is inserted in that order into the set.

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I like this recipe, even though it's more general than I need. I wonder why this recipe was replaced with another one in the current itertools documentation? –  max Dec 12 '12 at 8:56
    
@max: It was replaced with the pairwise recipe to illustrate tee. The recipes are there to show off the functions of the module, and tee() was yet to be used on that page. –  Martijn Pieters Dec 12 '12 at 9:55
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You could use the pairwise itertools recipe:

>>> from itertools import tee
>>> def pairwise(iterable):
        a, b = tee(iterable)
        next(b, None)
        return zip(a, b)

>>> pairwise({1, 2, 3, 4})
<zip object at 0x0000000003B34D88>
>>> list(_)
[(1, 2), (2, 3), (3, 4)]
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Now that I understand the question

from itertools import islice
a = {'A','B','C','D'}
zip(a,islice(a,1,None))
#[('A', 'C'), ('C', 'B'), ('B', 'D')]
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