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I'm trying to write a class-template where the method signatures change depending on the template parameters. My goal is to have as little code duplication as possible. Consider this example, first the class declaration:

// a.hxx
#ifndef A_HXX
#define A_HXX

template<typename T>
struct A
{
    void foo(T value) const;
    void bar() const;
};

#include <string>

#ifndef short_declaration
template<>
struct A<std::string>
{
    void foo(const std::string &value) const;
    void bar() const;
};
#else // short_declaration
template<>
struct A<std::string>
{
    void foo(const std::string &value) const;
};
#endif // short_declaration

#endif // A_HXX

Now the class definition:

// a_impl.hxx
#ifndef A_IMPL_HXX
#define A_IMPL_HXX

#include "a.hxx"
#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

template<typename T>
void A<T>::foo(T value) const
{
    std::cout << "A<T=" << typeid(T).name() << ">::foo(" << value << ")"
        << std::endl;
}

template<typename T>
void A<T>::bar() const
{
    std::cout << "A<T=" << typeid(T).name() << ">::bar()" << std::endl;
}

void A<std::string>::foo(const std::string &value) const
{
    std::cout << "A<std::string>::foo(" << value << ")" << std::endl;
}

#ifndef skip_duplicates
void A<std::string>::bar() const
{
    std::cout << "A<std::string>::bar()" << std::endl;
}
#endif // skip_duplicates

#endif // A_IMPL_HXX

And now a test program:

// test.cxx

//#define skip_duplicates
//#define short_declaration
#include "a_impl.hxx"

int main(void)
{
    A<int>         obj1;
    A<std::string> obj2;
    int         value1(1);
    std::string value2("baz");

    obj1.foo(value1);
    obj1.bar();

    obj2.foo(value2);
    obj2.bar();

    return 0;
}

If compiled like this, I get the expected output of (for my implementation of typeid):

A<T=i>::foo(1)
A<T=i>::bar()
A<std::string>::foo(baz)
A<std::string>::bar()

But I would of course like a way to enable either skip_duplicates or even short_declaration in my example. To a somewhat similar question, ecatmur replied that the full class needs to be given, so at least defining short_declaration would not work.

How do others handle the problem of creating class templates with methods that may take large objects as arguments?

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2 Answers 2

You could extract the duplicates into a base class:

template<typename T>
struct Base{
    void Bar()
    {
        std::cout << "A<T=" << typeid(T).name() << ">::bar()" << std::endl;
    }

protected:
    ~Base(){}
    template<typename U>
    void DoFoo(U value)
    {
        std::cout << "A<T=" << typeid(T).name() << ">::foo(" << value << ")"
        << std::endl;
    }
};

template<typename T>
struct A : Base<T> {
    void Foo(T value)
    {
        DoFoo(value);
    }
};

template<>
struct A<std::string> : Base<std::string> {
    void Foo(const std::string& value)
    {
        DoFoo(value);
    }
};
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1  
You could even write template<typename T, typename U=T> struct NarrowBase:Base<T>{void Foo(const U& value){DoFoo(value);}};, which reduces A<std::string> to template<> struct A<std::string>:NarrowBase<std::string> {}; for even more compactness. –  Yakk Dec 11 '12 at 13:07
    
@hansmaad: Separating out the non-specialised methods in a base class is a very good suggestion. But putting the specialised methods in the base class as protected method-templates does not work for me: the pointer to value is different in Base::DoFoo() and A::Foo(). –  Olaf Mandel Dec 11 '12 at 13:10
    
@handmaad, @Yakk: A variant of Yakks suggestion works, where the Base class template itself already takes two parameters T and U and the class template definition A sets U=T and the specialisation then explicitly sets U=const std::string &. –  Olaf Mandel Dec 11 '12 at 13:27
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Based on the answer by hansmaad and the comment by Yakk, I think the following is the solution I will go with:

// a.hxx
#ifndef A_HXX
#define A_HXX

template<typename T, typename U=T>
struct Abase
{
    void foo(U value) const;
    void bar() const;
};

template<typename T>
struct A : Abase<T> { };

#include <string>

template<>
struct A<std::string> : Abase<std::string, const std::string &> { };

#endif // A_HXX

And this implementation:

// a_impl.hxx
#ifndef A_IMPL_HXX
#define A_IMPL_HXX

#include "a.hxx"
#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

template<typename T, typename U>
void Abase<T, U>::foo(U value) const
{
    std::cout << "A<T=" << typeid(T).name() << ",U=" << typeid(U).name()
        << ">::foo(" << value << "): &value=" << int(&value) << std::endl;
}

template<typename T, typename U>
void Abase<T, U>::bar() const
{
    std::cout << "A<T=" << typeid(T).name() << ",U=" << typeid(U).name()
        << ">::bar()" << std::endl;
}

#endif // A_IMPL_HXX

The test program can remain as is or get additional lines like these:

//...
    std::cout << "&value=" << int(&value1) << std::endl;
//...
    std::cout << "&value=" << int(&value2) << std::endl;
//...

Thank you both for answering and for your suggestions!

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