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I have a file data.txt like this.

>1BN5.txt
207
208
211
>1B24.txt
88
92

I have a folder F1 that contains text files.

1BN5.txt file in F1 folder is shown below.

ATOM    421  CA  SER A 207      68.627 -29.819   8.533  1.00 50.79           C 
ATOM    421  CA  SER A 207      68.627 -29.819   8.533  1.00 50.79           C  
ATOM    422  C   SER A 248      70.124 -29.955   8.226  1.00 55.81           C 
ATOM    615  H   LEU B 208       3.361  -5.394  -6.021  1.00 10.00           H
ATOM    616  HA  LEU B 211       2.930  -4.494  -3.302  1.00 10.00           H 
ATOM    626  N   MET B  87       1.054  -3.071  -5.633  1.00 10.00           N  
ATOM    627  CA  MET B  87      -0.213  -2.354  -5.826  1.00 10.00           C 

1B24.txt file in F1 folder is shown below.

ATOM    630  CB  MET B  87      -0.476  -2.140  -7.318  1.00 10.00           C 
ATOM    631  CG  MET B  88      -0.828  -0.688  -7.575  1.00 10.00           C
ATOM    632  SD  MET B  88      -2.380  -0.156  -6.830  1.00 10.00           S
ATOM    643  N   ALA B  92      -1.541  -4.371  -5.366  1.00 10.00           N  
ATOM    644  CA  ALA B  94      -2.560  -5.149  -4.675  1.00 10.00           C

I need only the lines containing 207,208,211(6th column)in 1BN5.txt file. I want to delete other lines in 1BN5.txt file. Like this, I need only the lines containing 88,92 in 1B24.txt file.

Desired output

1BN5.txt file

ATOM    421  CA  SER A 207      68.627 -29.819   8.533  1.00 50.79           C
ATOM    421  CA  SER A 207      68.627 -29.819   8.533  1.00 50.79           C 
ATOM    615  H   LEU B 208       3.361  -5.394  -6.021  1.00 10.00           H  
ATOM    616  HA  LEU B 211       2.930  -4.494  -3.302  1.00 10.00           H

1B24.txt file

ATOM    631  CG  MET B  88      -0.828  -0.688  -7.575  1.00 10.00           C
ATOM    632  SD  MET B  88      -2.380  -0.156  -6.830  1.00 10.00           S
ATOM    643  N   ALA B  92      -1.541  -4.371  -5.366  1.00 10.00           N 
share|improve this question
    
Judging from the errors you are getting from several reasonable answers, there may be some extra characters in your file data.txt. –  Joseph Quinsey Dec 12 '12 at 12:53
    
There are no extra characters in file data.txt. –  user1606106 Dec 12 '12 at 13:54

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's one way using GNU awk. Run like:

awk -f script.awk data.txt

Contents of script.awk:

/^>/ {
    file = substr($1,2)
    next
}

{
    a[file][$1]
}

END {

    for (i in a) {

        while ( ( getline line < ("./F1/" i) ) > 0 ) {

            split(line,b)

            for (j in a[i]) {

                if (b[6]==j) {

                    print line > "./F1/" i ".new"
                }
            }
        }

        system(sprintf("mv ./F1/%s.new ./F1/%s", i, i))
    }
}

Alternatively, here's the one-liner:

awk '/^>/ { file = substr($1,2); next } { a[file][$1] } END { for (i in a) { while ( ( getline line < ("./F1/" i) ) > 0 ) { split(line,b); for (j in a[i]) if (b[6]==j) print line > "./F1/" i ".new" } system(sprintf("mv ./F1/%s.new ./F1/%s", i, i)) } }' data.txt


If you have an older version of awk, older than GNU Awk 4.0.0, you could try the following. Run like:

awk -f script.awk data.txt

Contents of script.awk:

/^>/ {
    file = substr($1,2)
    next
}

{
    a[file]=( a[file] ? a[file] SUBSEP : "") $1
}

END {

    for (i in a) {

        split(a[i],b,SUBSEP)

        while ( ( getline line < ("./F1/" i) ) > 0 ) {

            split(line,c)

            for (j in b) {

                if (c[6]==b[j]) {

                    print line > "./F1/" i ".new"
                }
            }
        }

        system(sprintf("mv ./F1/%s.new ./F1/%s", i, i))
    }
}

Alternatively, here's the one-liner:

awk '/^>/ { file = substr($1,2); next } { a[file]=( a[file] ? a[file] SUBSEP : "") $1 } END { for (i in a) { split(a[i],b,SUBSEP); while ( ( getline line < ("./F1/" i) ) > 0 ) { split(line,c); for (j in b) if (c[6]==b[j]) print line > "./F1/" i ".new" } system(sprintf("mv ./F1/%s.new ./F1/%s", i, i)) } }' data.txt


Please note that this script does exactly as you describe. It expects files like 1BN5.txt and 1B24.txt to reside in the folder F1 in the present working directory. It will also overwrite your original files. If this is not the desired behavior, drop the system() call. HTH.

Results:

Contents of F1/1BN5.txt:

ATOM    421  CA  SER A 207      68.627 -29.819   8.533  1.00 50.79           C 
ATOM    421  CA  SER A 207      68.627 -29.819   8.533  1.00 50.79           C  
ATOM    615  H   LEU B 208       3.361  -5.394  -6.021  1.00 10.00           H
ATOM    616  HA  LEU B 211       2.930  -4.494  -3.302  1.00 10.00           H 

Contents of F1/1B24.txt:

ATOM    631  CG  MET B  88      -0.828  -0.688  -7.575  1.00 10.00           C
ATOM    632  SD  MET B  88      -2.380  -0.156  -6.830  1.00 10.00           S
ATOM    643  N   ALA B  92      -1.541  -4.371  -5.366  1.00 10.00           N
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. your code worked well with my example. But for large files,I don't get the correct output. It prints only few lines. If you increase the number of lines in my example you can understand the difference. –  user1606106 Dec 11 '12 at 15:02
    
@user1606106: Hmm. I'll look into this now. Any chance at sending me those larger files? If you can, use Dropbox and some sort of compression I guess. –  Steve Dec 11 '12 at 23:00
    
@user1606106: I've updated the script for you. It should now work well for really large files. Please let me know if you have any problems. HTH. –  Steve Dec 12 '12 at 0:24
1  
@steve the getline's just redundant since awk reads all the lines in a file without it so it's like if you had a script/tool that does WHILE read line { workon line } and you modify it to the moral equivalent of WHILE read line { IF some condition { WHILE read otherline { workon otherline } } }. Even when it's safe, it's not a great approach... –  Ed Morton Dec 12 '12 at 15:09
1  
simple example of the issues with the getline approach above vs the non-getline solution I posted. Ignore the initial file. Lets say you want to enhance your script to additionally print the 4th field of the 17th line of every selected file? With the getline approach you'd need to introduce a variable to count the lines read and then invoke split() whereas with the non-getline you just use FNR and $4. You could drop the "line" variable to get the split for free but then you've lost the original $0. You could create a variable to store that... Get the point? It's just a mess of workarounds. –  Ed Morton Dec 12 '12 at 17:12

Don't try to delete lines from the existing file, try to create a new file with only the lines you want to have:

cat 1bn5.txt | awk '$6 == 207 || $6 == 208 || $6 == 211 { print }' > output.txt
share|improve this answer

assuming gnu awk, run this command from the directory containing data.txt:

awk -F">" '{if($2 != ""){fname=$2}if($2 == ""){term=$1;system("grep "term" F1/"fname" >>F1/"fname"_results");}}' data.txt

this parses data.txt for filenames and search terms, then calls grep from inside awk to append the matches from each file and term listed in data.txt to a new file in F1 called originalfilename.txt_results.

if you want to replace the original files completely, you could then run this command:

grep "^>.*$" data.txt | sed 's/>//' | xargs -I{} find F1 -name {}_results -exec mv F1/{}_results F1/{} \;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. your code worked well. But unwanted lines are printing with the output. –  user1606106 Dec 11 '12 at 23:32
    
if you can provide a larger sample set or expand on what extra unwanted output you're seeing, I can try to make some revisions. –  nullrevolution Dec 12 '12 at 1:25

This will move all of the files in F1 to a tmp dir named "backup" and then re-create just the resultant non-empty files under F1

mv F1 backup &&
mkdir F1 &&
awk '
NF==FNR {
   if (sub(/>/,"")) {
      file=$0
      ARGV[ARGC++] = "backup/" file
   }
   else {
      tgt[file,$0] = "F1/" file
   }
   next
}
(FILENAME,$6) in tgt {
   print > tgt[FILENAME,$6]
}
' data.txt &&
rm -rf backup

If you want the empty files too it's a trivial tweak and if you want to keep the backup dir just get rid of the "&& rm.." at the end (do that during testing anyway).

EDIT: FYI this is one case where you could argue the case for getline not being completely incorrect since it's parsing a first file that's totally unlike the rest of the files in structure and intent so parsing that one file differently from the rest isn't going to cause any maintenance headaches later:

mv F1 backup &&
mkdir F1 &&
awk -v data="data.txt" '
BEGIN {
   while ( (getline line < data) > 0 ) {
      if (sub(/>/,"",line)) {
         file=line
         ARGV[ARGC++] = "backup/" file
      }
      else {
         tgt[file,line] = "F1/" file
      }
   }
}
(FILENAME,$6) in tgt {
   print > tgt[FILENAME,$6]
}
' &&
rm -rf backup

but as you can see it makes the script a bit more complicated (though slightly more efficient as there's now no test for FNR==NR in the main body).

share|improve this answer
    
I'm a little confused, probably because it's getting on 1am ... but what's the point of FNR==NR when only one file is listed in the arguments list? and where does "tmpdir/" come from? –  Steve Dec 12 '12 at 14:44
    
We start out with just one file but then as it's reading the first file it's adding file names to ARGV so after reading the first file, there are many files now to parse. "tmpdir" should be "backup", I'll fix it, thanks. –  Ed Morton Dec 12 '12 at 14:52
    
Wow that's a neat solution - I'd give it another vote if I could. Thankyou for the explanation :-) –  Steve Dec 12 '12 at 14:58
    
@steve You're welcome and I just added a getline-appropriate alternative too, just for a change of pace :-). –  Ed Morton Dec 12 '12 at 15:02

This solution plays some tricks with the record separator: "data.txt" uses > as the record separator, while the other files use newline.

awk '
    BEGIN {RS=">"}
    FNR == 1 {
        # since the first char in data.txt is the record separator, 
        # there is an empty record before the real data starts
        next
    }
    {
        n = split($0, a, "\n")
        file = "F1/" a[1]
        newfile = file ".new"
        RS="\n"
        while (getline < file) {
            for (i=2; i<n; i++) {
                if ($6 == a[i]) {
                    print > newfile
                    break
                }
            }
        }
        RS=">"
        system(sprintf("mv \"%s\" \"%s.bak\" && mv \"%s\" \"%s\"", file, file, newfile, file))
    }
' data.txt 
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer.when I am running your code I am getting error ^ invalid char ''' in expression. How to solve this error? –  user1606106 Dec 11 '12 at 23:03
    
Don't know. I didn't get any errors while testing. Did you cut and paste or re-type? –  glenn jackman Dec 12 '12 at 1:18
    
would fail for file names containing spaces and unsafe use of getline (not testing it's return). Also not sure if all non-gawk awks (which only allow a single character in RS) would treat RS="\n" as RS=newline or if some or all of them would treat it as RS=backslash. You might need to use RS=sprintf("%s","\n"). Finally the print should use > instead of >> (what you have would only do harm if the file existed but it's misleading at best). –  Ed Morton Dec 12 '12 at 13:33
    
True about >>. What about filenames with spaces? I'm using RS=> and then splitting on newlines. –  glenn jackman Dec 12 '12 at 15:10
    
It's the system("mv"). You need to quote where the file names will be populated in that string. –  Ed Morton Dec 12 '12 at 15:13

Definitely a job for awk:

$ awk '$6==207||$6==208||$6==211 { print }' 1bn5.txt
ATOM    421  CA  SER A 207      68.627 -29.819   8.533  1.00 50.79           C 
ATOM    421  CA  SER A 207      68.627 -29.819   8.533  1.00 50.79           C  
ATOM    615  H   LEU B 208       3.361  -5.394  -6.021  1.00 10.00           H
ATOM    616  HA  LEU B 211       2.930  -4.494  -3.302  1.00 10.00           H 

$ awk '$6==92||$6==88 { print }' 1B24.txt
ATOM    631  CG  MET B  88      -0.828  -0.688  -7.575  1.00 10.00           C
ATOM    632  SD  MET B  88      -2.380  -0.156  -6.830  1.00 10.00           S
ATOM    643  N   ALA B  92      -1.541  -4.371  -5.366  1.00 10.00           N 

Redirect to save the output:

$ awk '$6==207||$6==208||$6==211 { print }' 1bn5.txt > output.txt
share|improve this answer

I don't think you can do this with just sed alone. You need a loop to read your file data.txt. For example, using a bash script:

#!/bin/bash

# First remove all possible "problematic" characters from data.txt, storing result
# in data.clean.txt. This removes everything except A-Z, a-z, 0-9, leading >, and ..
sed 's/[^A-Za-z0-9>\.]//g;s/\(.\)>/\1/g;/^$/d' data.txt >| data.clean.txt

# Next determine which lines to keep:
cat data.clean.txt | while read line; do
   if [[ "${line:0:1}" == ">" ]]; then
      # If input starts with ">", set remainder to be the current file
      file="${line:1}"
   else
      # If value is in sixth column, add "keep" to end of line
      # Columns assumed separated by one or more spaces
      # "+" is a GNU extension, so we need the -r switch
      sed -i -r "/^[^ ]+ +[^ ]+ +[^ ]+ +[^ ]+ +$line +/s/$/keep/" $file
   fi
done

# Finally delete the unwanted lines, i.e. those without "keep":
# (assumes each file appears only once in data.txt)
cat data.clean.txt | while read line; do
   if [[ "${line:0:1}" == ">" ]]; then
      sed -i -n "/keep/{s/keep//g;p;}" ${line:1}
   fi
done
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer.when I am running your code I am getting error "unary operator expected". How to solve this error? –  user1606106 Dec 11 '12 at 23:02
    
Works ok for me, in my environment. But stackoverflow.com/a/408980/318716 suggests changing the [ to [[ might help, and ] to ]]. Does this work? –  Joseph Quinsey Dec 11 '12 at 23:15
    
A better suggestion: replace the two ${line:0:1} with "${line:0:1}". Your data.txt may have a blank line, or something similar. –  Joseph Quinsey Dec 11 '12 at 23:25
    
I've added an initial cleanup of data.txt, to remove everything except A-Z, a-z, 0-9, leading >, and ., in case some extraneous characters are breaking the script. –  Joseph Quinsey Dec 12 '12 at 12:21
    
UUOC and would fail for files containing lines that start or end in spaces or contain backslashes or already have the word keep in them. –  Ed Morton Dec 12 '12 at 12:59

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