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Operating system : Ubuntu

Serial Ports Using : USB->Serial adapter (prolific PL2303)

I have a sample serial port read and write programs. While running the applications,I am trying to send 4100 bytes ,write program able to do it in single shot.

n = write (s_port,msg,4100);

Here I am checking 'n' value and it is 4100

I*strong text*n receiving end

n = read(s_port,msg,5000);

Above line is in a loop, I am getting not more than 32 bytes in a single read attempt.So more than 128 read attempts(32+32+32 etc...) to get full bytes(4100)

In sending side If it is able to push the whole bytes in a single shot, why not able to receive in single shot?

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2 Answers 2

Serial communications take time for individual bytes to be transferred depending on the baud rate. CPU is much faster in processing the bytes once received.

With the write the serial communication device interface is able to buffer up the bytes to be sent. The read however has to take the bytes as they are received from the other device so there is a time lag.

Here is an wikipedia article on the RS-232 Serial Communications standard.

Compare the serial port to this wikipedia article on the Parallel port.

The parallel port had one wire per bit so that all of the bits are transferred at the same time where as the serial port transferred the bits serially, one at a time. Parallel ports were used for higher speed transfers such as for printers at a time when serial port speeds were pretty low. Serial port speeds have dramatically improved over the years though still no where near USB speeds.

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,So that means in writing side, whole data is kept in buffer and sending part by part only ? –  Arun Dec 11 '12 at 13:45
    
@Arun: Sure part by part, that why it's called a serial connection ... –  alk Dec 11 '12 at 16:22
    
Serial communications sends a bit at a time which is why the minimum cable is a send wire, receive wire, and ground (I think it is ground). The Serial Communications Port device into which the cable is plugged reads the signal voltages on the receive wire and creates a series of ones and zeros from the voltage changes when receiving data or takes the series of bits and sends out a series of voltage changes when sending data. The Serial Port device aggregates the series of bits into a complete byte to provide to the user of the port. –  Richard Chambers Dec 11 '12 at 19:47

It's the general nature of serial to USB converters and you'll have to deal with data being received in smaller chunks. I thought the PL2303 had a 64 byte buffer but regardless it's well under what you're trying to transfer in a single read.

Also being asynchronous there are no delimeters to specify the start and end of a chunk of data, so the chip / driver has to make a decision on where to break the data stream depending on the on-chip buffer size and other rules they may implement such as timeouts before forwarding the data as a USB packet.

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So if in a direct serial to serial setup ( I mean without USB to serial adapter), will receive the whole byte in a single shot , right ? –  Arun Dec 11 '12 at 13:39
    
Serial communications sends a bit at a time which is why the minimum cable is a send wire, receive wire, and ground (I think it is ground). The Serial Communications Port device into which the cable is plugged reads the signal voltages on the receive wire and creates a series of ones and zeros from the voltage changes when receiving data or takes the series of bits and sends out a series of voltage changes when sending data. The Serial Port device aggregates the series of bits into a complete byte to provide to the user of the port. –  Richard Chambers Dec 11 '12 at 19:46

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