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All, I have an application I want to lanch from another application or as a stand alone utility. To facilitate the start up of appA from appB, I use the following code in Main()/Program.cs

[STAThread]
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Application.EnableVisualStyles();
    Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
    Application.Run(new SqlEditorForm(args));
} 

Now, in SqlEditorForm I have two constructors

public SqlEditorForm(string[] args)
    : this()
{
    InitializeComponent();

    // Test if called from appB...
    if (args != null && args.Count() > 0)
    {
        // Do stuff here...
    }
}

and the deafult

public SqlEditorForm()
{
    // Always do lots of stuff here...
}

This to me looks fine, but when run as stand alone (args.Length = 0) the SqlEditorForm(string[] args) constructor is getting called, and before it steps into the constructor to perform InitializeComponent();, it goes and initialises all of the global variables for the class then steps directly into the default constructor.

Question, The chaining of the constructors seems to be happending in the wrong order. I want to know why?

Thanks for your time.

share|improve this question
    
What really is the question here? –  Lews Therin Dec 11 '12 at 12:53
    
The chaining of the constructors seems to be happending in the wrong order. I want to know why? Thanks. –  Killercam Dec 11 '12 at 12:56
    
Why down vote. It is a legitimate question - well formatted. spell checked with love. Not even so much as a comment to explain - well thats just bad manners... –  Killercam Dec 11 '12 at 13:01
1  
    
Thanks. Appreciated... –  Killercam Dec 11 '12 at 13:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Move all logic to constructor with parameter and call that constructor from parameterless one, passing default parameter value:

public SqlEditorForm()
    :this(null)
{        
}

public SqlEditorForm(string[] args)
{   
    InitializeComponent();
    // Always do lots of stuff here...

    if (args != null && args.Count() > 0)
    {
        // Do stuff here...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But why should the parameterless constructor be called first; : this() says call the default after the overridden constructor. It should not matter where I put InitializeComponent(); should it!? The way I have set Main(string[] args) mean the overridden constructor should always be called... –  Killercam Dec 11 '12 at 12:59
    
@Killercam sorry, fixed (for some reason initially I thought about base call..) - move all logic to constructor with parameter. And call that constructor from your parameterless one, passing default parameter value. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Dec 11 '12 at 13:05
    
Thanks very much. This is news to me! Clearly the ordering of the chaining for constructors in WinForms is somewhat different. Am I right in saying this? Again, thanks for your time... –  Killercam Dec 11 '12 at 13:17
    
@Killercam here is useful link about Chanin Constructors refactoring –  Sergey Berezovskiy Dec 11 '12 at 13:22
    
Thanks you. However, I want to note that this is not just about chaining. WinForms treats this chaining differently including the InitialisComponent() method... –  Killercam Dec 11 '12 at 14:42

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