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I have a process which contain two threads. I want to schedule them based on their priority(SCHED_RR policy). Let t1,t2 are two threads having priority 1 (lowest). I want to make sure that my thread t1 should not be pre-empted/rescheduled while it is doing a critical task. So I have boosted its priority to maximum before critical task and reduced to original after critical task.

thread_proc_t1()
{
    while(1)
    {
        if(critical condition happens)
        {
            set_priority_max();
        }

        printf("t1");
        usleep(xxx);

        if(critical task finished )
        {
            reset_priority();
        }

    }   
}

thread_proc_t2()
{
    while(1)
    {
        printf("t2");
        usleep(xxx);
    }   
}

I expect the prints from t2 shall not happen when called set_priority_max() in t1. But the output contains prints from t2 also. 1. Why it so? 2. How can I solve this problem?

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's no problem, this is expected behavior.

First, if you have more than one core, then the priorities won't matter if there are fewer ready-to-run threads than cores -- each thread will get its own core.

Second, your high-priority thread sleeps, which gives the lower-priority thread time to run.

Third, your threads interact through the lock that protects standard output. The higher-priority thread can be waiting for that lock, allowing lower-priority threads to run.

Please don't try to use priorities this way. It adds massive complexity, hurts performance, and rarely accomplishes anything useful.

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Thank you. Now I understood the bug in code. How i make my thread that wont be pre-empted/rescheduled? –  dday Dec 11 '12 at 13:11
    
You can't. Why would you want to? Imagine if there's only one core and the thread needs a lock another thread holds. If it's not pre-empted or rescheduled, you deadlock forever. I can't tell quite where, but it seems you have a misunderstanding about the whole point of threads or the division of responsibility between the scheduler and the application developer. Here's the right approach: If you don't want a thread to do something, don't code it to do that. If you'd always rather do A than B, then make your code do A and not B. –  David Schwartz Dec 11 '12 at 13:11
    
Thank you. This was a doubt regarding an API in vxworks(taskLock) - which is for locking a task (in vxworks) for pre-empting –  dday Dec 11 '12 at 13:25
1  
Even taskLock doesn't do what you claim to want to do. If the thread sleeps, for example, the OS will do a context switch. Things like taskLock have no place on modern, general-purpose computers. If you describe your use case, I can tell you the right way to do it on a general-purpose OS. –  David Schwartz Dec 11 '12 at 13:27
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