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How do you add a font to a page.

For example lets say I have a particular .TTF file.

And I want to use this file on a particular webpage. Now with all browsers processing different fonts differently is it possible in CSS to add the "font file" in the font-family tag.

I'm sorry if this is unsolvable or unbelievably simple I'm a newbie to CSS.

share|improve this question
    
change the title – rOcKiNg RhO Dec 11 '12 at 13:01
1  
I would recommend not to use any special fonts... it will make your page load slower. – Ladineko Dec 11 '12 at 13:03
    
@Ladineko So will images and css and any other resource. Best to avoid it all, right? Who cares about design anyway? – peirix Dec 11 '12 at 13:05
    
@peirix Images, css wont effect the speed that much. Ofcourse every element takes down speed. but a special font takes it down alot cause every single character has to be loaded for all the text. – Ladineko Dec 11 '12 at 13:07
1  
@Ladineko You're talking about marginal stuff here. You can easily get your font files down to 100kb each, and you usually only need 3. That's not a heavy load. It'll be cached. And you can take measurements to ease this. stevesouders.com/blog/2009/10/13/font-face-and-performance Avoiding custom fonts for that reason is not a good option, imo. Btw, do you have any reference to back up that every character for the entire text needs to "load"? This is new to me, and I'm not sure I believe it. – peirix Dec 11 '12 at 13:18
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Create the font folder and save all the font files

    @font-face {
        font-family: 'Archer-Semibold';
        src: url('fonts/archer-semibold-pro.eot');
        src: url('fonts/archer-semibold-pro.eot?#iefix') format('embedded-opentype'),
                 url('fonts/archer-semibold-pro.woff') format('woff'),
                 url('fonts/archer-semibold-pro.ttf') format('truetype'),
                 url('fonts/archer-semibold-pro.svg#archer-semibold-pro') format('svg');
        font-weight: normal;
        font-style: normal;
    }

.menu {
  font-family: Archer-Semibold;
}

url('fonts/archer-semibold-pro.eot') is use for IE 9 and url('fonts/archer-semibold-pro.eot?#iefix') is used for IE 6 to 8

share|improve this answer
    
Just one question why have you given so many formats. Is it because different browsers use different fonts? – cjds Dec 11 '12 at 15:38
    
ofcourse. View this article. – vusan Dec 12 '12 at 3:13
    
Nice one. Correct answer for the browser fix . – cjds Dec 12 '12 at 3:17

This page should help you.

You declare your new font with:

@font-face { 
  font-family: Delicious; 
  src: url('Delicious-Roman.otf'); 
} 

Then reference it with

h1 {
  font-family: Delicious;
}
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If you have a .ttf-file that you own, you can go to a site that will make web fonts for you (for instance font-squirrel: http://www.fontsquirrel.com/fontface/generator).

You'll get a zip with the fonts, a CSS-file with some font-face declerations. That should get you started.

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Use the @font-face

@font-face {
    font-family:font-name;
    src: url(path-to-font/font-name);
} 
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Try this:

@charset "utf-8";       //file encoding

@font-face {
font-family: 'GoodDogRegular';
src: local("GoodDog Regular");
url('fonts/gooddog-webfont.ttf') format('truetype'),
font-weight: normal;
font-style: normal;
}

You can now use this font like a regular font in your CSS.

.menu {
font-family:GoodDogRegular;
color:#dd0000;
font-size: 36px;
font-weight:bold;
}
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