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Problem - I am trying my hand at plugIn development and all is going well except where trying to cast object A to object B even though A implements B.

Interface:

namespace DynamicApplications
{
    public interface IPlugIn
    {
        string Name { get; set; }
        IPlugInHost myHost { set; }
        void Show();
    }

    public interface IPlugInHost
    {
        bool Register(IPlugIn plug);
    }
}

Class which Implements IPlugIn

namespace plugInOne
{
    class PlugIn : IPlugIn
    {
        IPlugInHost _myHost;

        public string Name
        {
            get
            {
                return "Plug-In One";
            }
            set
            {
            }
        }

        public IPlugInHost myHost
        {
            set
            {
                _myHost = value;
            }
        }

        public void Show()
        {
        }
    }
}

And now THE CODE for the instantiation:

        String path = Application.StartupPath;
        string[] assemblyNames = Directory.GetFiles(path, "*.dll");
        plugs = new IPlugIn[assemblyNames.Length];

        for(int i = 0; i < assemblyNames.Length; i++)
        {
            string Name = assemblyNames[i];
            Name = Name.Substring(Name.LastIndexOf("\\") + 1, Name.Length - Name.LastIndexOf("\\") - 1);
            Name = Name.Remove(Name.LastIndexOf(".dll"));
            assemblyNames[i] = Name;
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < assemblyNames.Length; i++)
        {
            Assembly DLL = Assembly.Load(assemblyNames[i]);

            if(DLL != null)
            {
                try
                {
                    Object p = Activator.CreateInstance(DLL.GetType(assemblyNames[i] + ".PlugIn"));

                    if (p is DynamicApplications.IPlugIn)
                    {
                        MessageBox.Show("YES!!!!");
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        MessageBox.Show("no>?>?>>><<?????");
                    }

                    plugs[i] = (IPlugIn)p;
                }
                catch(Exception ex)
                {
                    MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
                }
            }
        }

Note the debugger shows that p is in fact instantiated and accessible

The Application always hits MessageBox.Show("no>?>?>>><<?????");

Help Please

Aiden

EDIT

P is of Type:

P is of Type: Also

enter image description here

YET plugInOne.PlugIn implements IPlugIn

share|improve this question
    
Have your messagebox show what type p is. Once you know that, you probably don't need more help. –  tallseth Dec 11 '12 at 13:52
    
You seem to be referencing different assemblies. Common mistake. –  leppie Dec 11 '12 at 13:52
    
I (1) put the interface and instantiation code in a console app, (2) referenced the console app from a class library and put the implementation in the library, (3) built the library and put the DLL in the console app's folder, (4) ran the console app and the consoel equivalent of MessageBox.Show("YES!!!!"); did fire. In principle you're doing nothing wong; in practice maybe your DLL isn't there, or is out of date, or something. –  Rawling Dec 11 '12 at 14:12
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your referencing a DynamicApplications.IPlugIn and that is not the same interface which will be contained in the assembly.

You need to get your IPlugin instance from your assembly instead of using a local instance. Your code for checking is fine, if you did something like this:

public interface IA { }
public class A :IA { }


object a = Activator.CreateInstance<A>();
if (a is IA)
    Console.WriteLine("Yes");

However you are getting your A (in the above context) from somewhere else, and still trying to reference your local version of IA - therefore you need to get your interface from your assembly instead of trying to reference it locally. Perhaps you could do something like this:

if (objA.GetType().GetInterfaces().Any(x => x.Name == "IA"))
  Console.WriteLine("Yes");
share|improve this answer
1  
Ok holnd on quickly - i am confused. I instantiate an object of Type plugInOne.PlugIn which implements DynamicApplications.IPlugIn and then test if the instantiated object is of type DynamicApplications.IPlugIn (which it should be since thats the way i coded it). Sorry but please explain some more –  Aiden Strydom Dec 11 '12 at 14:13
    
o and ps. if (objA.GetType().GetInterfaces().Any(x => x.Name == "IA")) Console.WriteLine("Yes"); passes –  Aiden Strydom Dec 11 '12 at 14:14
2  
You are instansiating a type from an assembly and then checking if the type you have instansiated implements a LOCAL version of an interface, the type from the assembly will implement the assemblies version of the interface not the local version because it knows nothing about it. –  LukeHennerley Dec 11 '12 at 14:19
1  
@LukeHennerley What makes you think there is a local version of the interface? (Edit: Maybe that comment that says the name check passes, I guess...) –  Rawling Dec 11 '12 at 14:30
1  
@AidenStrydom Not a problem, usually the simplest problems are the longest to get your head around. –  LukeHennerley Dec 12 '12 at 9:14
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