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Trying to do it through a loop that traverses through the list.

In the loop I'm feeding the head node into a sorting function that I have defined and then I'm using strcmp to find out if which name in the node should come first.

It is not working because writing the names too early.

Im comparing them all linearly by going down the list one node at a time and not going back to see if the first should come before the last. That part explained would be helpful.

The two functions that are most important to me now are defined as follows: I have tried my best to do what I think is right for the sorting function.

void list::displayByName(ostream& out) const
{
    list *ListPtr = NULL;
    node *current_node = headByName;
    winery *wine_t = new winery(); 
    // winery is another class object type
    // im allocating it to prevent a crash when I call it.

    while ( current_node != NULL )
    {
        *(wine_t) = current_node->item;
        wine_t = ListPtr->sort( current_node );
        out << wine_t << endl;
        current_node = current_node->nextByName;
    }
    delete wine_t;
}

winery * const list::sort( node * current_node ) const
{
    // current_node is the first node.
    const char *SecondName = NULL, *FirstName  = NULL;
    winery *wine_t   = new winery();

    if ( current_node != NULL )
    {
        SecondName   = current_node->item.getName();            
        current_node = current_node->nextByName;
        FirstName    = current_node->item.getName();
    }

    if ( strcmp( FirstName, SecondName ) == -1 )
    {
        *(wine_t)  = current_node->item;
        FirstName  = NULL;
        SecondName = NULL;
        return wine_t;
    }
    else if ( strcmp( FirstName, SecondName ) == 1 )
    {
        *(wine_t) = current_node->item;
        FirstName = NULL;
        SecondName = NULL;
        return wine_t;
    }
    else return wine_t;// then the strings are equal

    FirstName  = NULL;
    SecondName = NULL;
    return wine_t;
}

And I started to develop my nodes here:

void list::insert(const winery& winery)
{
    node *current_node = new node( winery );

    if ( headByName == NULL )
    {
        headByName   = current_node;
        headByRating = current_node;
        tail         = headByName;
        current_node->prev = current_node;
    }
    else
    {
        current_node->prev = tail;
        tail->nextByName   = current_node;
    }

    tail = current_node;
    current_node = NULL;
}

I think its correct in that function above. Could I possibly get away with sorting it there?

Below are my varaibles that I am working with:

public list
{
         ...
    void insert(const winery& winery);
    void displayByName(ostream& out) const;
}
private:
    struct node
    {
        node(const winery& winery);     // constructor
        winery item;
        node * prev;
        node * nextByName;
        node * nextByRating;
    };

    winery * const sort(node*) const;
    node * headByName;
    node * headByRating;
    node * tail;
};

Any help is appreciated. Thanks very much =)

share|improve this question
    
@lampshade, Instead of posting duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/1309960/linkedlist-part you could correct your original question to add details. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Sep 5 '09 at 5:58
    
What the hell is wrong with you? –  Ed S. Sep 12 '09 at 22:25
    
I've contacted the SO team about it. –  GManNickG Sep 12 '09 at 22:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From what I understand, you want list::sort to find the least node in the list which is greater than the input.

To do this, you need to iterate through all the elements and keep the current least-but-greater node found.

Something like this:

node * const list::sort( node * given_node ) const
{
    if ( given_node == NULL )
    {
        return NULL;
    }

    // Smallest node found which is greater than given_node.
    node * least_found_node = NULL;

    // Node we are looking at right now.
    node * current_node = given_node->nextByName;

    // Go through all nodes.
    while ( current_node && current_node != given_node )
    {
        // Is this node bigger than the given node?
        if ( strcmp( current_node->item.getName(), given_node->item.getName() ) < 0 )
        {
            // Is this node smaller than the smallest node we know of?
            if ( least_found_node == NULL ||
               ((strcmp( current_node->item.getName(), least_found_node->item.getName() ) > 0) )
            {
                // We found a better node.
                least_found_node = current_node;
            }
        }

        current_node = current_node->nextByName;
    }

    return least_found_node;
}

Now change your display function to use it like this:

void list::displayByName(ostream& out) const
{
    // Find first node initially.
    node * current_node = sort( NULL );

    while ( current_node != NULL )
    {
        // Print node.
        out << current_node->item.getName();

        // Find next node in sorted output.
        current_node = sort( current_node );
    }
}

This part keeps calling sort until sort returns NULL. The first call to sort is with NULL so the lowest item is found (that is, the first in the sorted list). sort returns NULL if there are no more nodes larger than current_node, thus terminating the loop.

share|improve this answer
    
what is given node? –  user40120 Sep 5 '09 at 3:49
    
given_node is the lowest node you know of. You want to find the node after given_node in the sorted list. I made a mistake in how you would rewrite your display function. I will edit my answer shortly. –  strager Sep 5 '09 at 3:59
    
Thanks for your help ALOT! It really got me started. I did have to switch the second if's strcmp's param's to find the lowest node name. However, that is all it will find. Just the first one. It will not continue to print the rest based on the alphabet. BUt thanks! It definitely got me started. –  user40120 Sep 5 '09 at 23:42
    
@lampshade, My sort function only finds one. You have to keep calling sort to find the next ones. –  strager Sep 6 '09 at 0:08

Before I even get to the question asked, I observe some problems you probably want to address:

  • Your nodes have two different kinds of next's, but only one kind of prev. Is that really what you want, and if so, which next is paired with the prev?
  • The method you have named sort doesn't sort, but acts as a comparison.
  • You don't appear to have implemented an actual sort (or at least you haven't exhibited it here).
  • There is no need for the repetitive setting of FirstName and SecondName back to NULL in sort. They are local variables and simple disappear when the method returns.
  • There is no need to do two strcmp's in sort. Either cache the result of the first one ( int cmp=strcmp(...); ) or use a switch on the value returned by strcmp`.

To sort a double linked array I would I would suggest one of:

  1. Using a standard container that supports std::sort if this is allowed (but I'm guessing that this is homework, so probably not). I believe that std::list qualifies.
  2. Sorting at insertion time if the sort order will never change
  3. Implementing a partition sort (i.e. quicksort), which will work very nicely on this kind of structure (but the usual example code is given on arrays, so you will have to understand what is being done and why before the right way to implement it on linked lists becomes apparent).
share|improve this answer
    
Merge sort is a good one for linked lists. –  Zan Lynx Sep 5 '09 at 4:27

Why isn't using std::list (the STL's doubly-linked list) and its associated sort function appropriate here? If you defined an operator< for your list items, it will Just Work and you won't have to write a whole bunch of code just to have a list and sort it.

share|improve this answer

I wouldn't bother to write my own sort function. I'd just use qsort. Since it's interface is c and not c++, to use it you just build an array of object pointers, then call qsort on it with your own comparator function. Then rebuild the linked list from the newly sorted array of object pointers.

share|improve this answer
    
I will end up having to use a swap technique..Isnt that terribly ineffecient to do with linked lists? –  user40120 Sep 5 '09 at 2:51
    
I forgot to mention that my node ctor must accept a winery type as its only param...its diffcult to make a node varaible array that way..like..node **nArray = new node*[size]; gives me an error:error C2440: '=' : cannot convert from 'int' to 'list::node **' –  user40120 Sep 5 '09 at 2:56
1  
You can't use qsort on a linked list of any variety. It works on arrays. It is a good suggestion if the OP can use arrays, but there may be other constraints. –  dmckee Sep 5 '09 at 3:18

If you are looking for an efficient in-place sort algorithm for linked lists, check out this one ... I've found it to be quite fast.

share|improve this answer

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