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I have a problem with using forward declarations in functions. Usually in global scope we can use address of undefined variable which declared using extern keyword. Look at the simple example.

typedef struct Id {
    int a;
}  xIdRec;

typedef xIdRec* IdN;

typedef struct ChId{
    int a;
    IdN* b;
}  ChIdRec;

extern ChIdRec Evn;
IdN Arr[] = {(IdN)&Evn};
ChIdRec Evn = {8, Arr};    

But how I can use this code during function definition? We can try use it like this.

void F (){
    typedef struct Id {
        int a;
    }  xIdRec;

    typedef xIdRec* IdN;

    typedef struct ChId{
        int a;
        IdN* b;
    }  ChIdRec;

    extern ChIdRec Evn;
    IdN Arr[] = {(IdN)&Evn};
    ChIdRec Evn = {8, Arr}; 
}

But now we have an error — error C2086: 'ChIdRec Evn' : redefinition. We can remove first declaration of Evn, but we will have another error — error C2065: 'Evn' : undeclared identifier.

How I can solve this bit problem?

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2  
ummm.. move it outside the function? – Luchian Grigore Dec 11 '12 at 15:19
    
struct ChIdRec is a local structure, how can it be instantiated outside of the function F()? – mark Dec 11 '12 at 15:27
    
Why do you again declare extern ChIdRec Evn locally? extern foo bar should only occur once, that is in the header to the module (if any) that implements foo bar. – alk Dec 11 '12 at 15:29
    
What exactly are you trying to achieve? Maybe also a clarification about the code might help. Is it two separate source files or is it just one? – davak Dec 11 '12 at 15:43

Do not repeat the definition of the types inside the function. In particular the typedef makes that this is a new identifier even if it has the same name and meaning as the global one.

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I think you think that the two code blocks are supposed to be compiled one after the other? – Yakk Dec 11 '12 at 15:41
    
I think the OP's error shows that's exactly what was happening. – Useless Dec 11 '12 at 16:18

extern means that the variable is defined in another code unit to be resolved by the linker. If the struct is defined in a local function, then I can't see how you can expect it to be extern as well.

The problem is that you have an external variable, and then you are trying to declare the same variable as local. The compiler is saying "make up your mind, is it external or is it local?".

It seems that the only reason for your forward declaration is so you can use the { } initialisation syntax on the struct. Better to assign member by member than to use a hack.

If you must then you could use void *, but that's sprinkled with traps for the unwary.

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extern ChIdRec Evn; does not do what you think it does when put inside a function.

A variable that is extern is a global variable. Even if you declare it inside a function. This lets you say you are using an extern global variable half way through a function body, right adjacent to where you access it. But it does mean you cannot "forward declare" a local variable.

Now, in theory you could create your struct at one spot without constructing it, do some more work, then in-place new with the uniform initializer syntax in C++11.

ie:

ChIdRec Evn;
IdN Arr[] = {(IdN)&Evn};
new(&Evn)ChIdRec{8, Arr}; 

or something like that. (Note the use of placement new, I am not creating memory on the free store (aka heap). Also note that double-construction of ChIdRec is dangerous if it is not POD -- if ChIdRec contained a std::string, I would expect the above to leak or crash, for example.

A slightly more ridiculous, yet correct, method:

unsigned char EvnBuff[sizeof(ChIdRec)];
IdN Arr[] = {reinterpret_cast<IdN>(&EvnBuff[0])};
new(&EvnBuff[0])ChIdRec{8, Arr}; 
ChIdRec& Evn = *reinterpret_cast<ChIdRec*>(&EvnBuff[0]);
// ... code goes here
Evn->~ChIdRec (); // before leaving body of function, iff ChIdRec::~ChIdRec exists

which could be dressed up in fancy stuff to make it exception safe and less awkward. Basically, a delayed-construction abstraction would make this marginally less ridiculous.

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