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I can't figure out the use for this code. Of what use is this pattern?

[code repeated here for posterity]

public class Turtle<T> where T : Turtle<T>
{
}
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13  
Its turtles all the way down... –  Juliet Sep 5 '09 at 2:50
    
Wha!? I've gotta be missing something... –  Justin Niessner Sep 5 '09 at 2:51
4  
Needs more turtles, if you ask me. –  Corey Sep 5 '09 at 2:51
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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This pattern essentially allows you to refer to a concrete subclass within the parent class. For example:

public abstract class Turtle<T> where T : Turtle<T>
{
    public abstract T Procreate();
}

public class SeaTurtle : Turtle<SeaTurtle>
{
    public override SeaTurtle Procreate()
    {
        // ...
    }
}

Versus:

public abstract class Turtle
{
    public abstract Turtle Procreate();
}

public class SnappingTurtle : Turtle
{
    public override Turtle Procreate()
    {
        // ...
    }
}

In the former, it's specified that a SeaTurtle's baby will be a SeaTurtle.

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Do you think, this kind of thing would not be required, if there is support for contra variance? –  shahkalpesh Sep 5 '09 at 5:20
1  
It's got more uses. It may implement interfaces for the subclass. Like, in Java, java.lang.Enum uses the pattern to implement java.lang.Comparable for the subclass. I'm sure C# has something similar. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 5 '09 at 7:07
    
There are certainly other uses, but they all involve the parent class needing to use the type of its subclass. Regarding implementation of interfaces, you have two choices: implement the interface for T or Turtle<T>. IComparable<T> would only let you compare items of the same subclass, where IComparable<Turtle<T>> would let you compare any Turtle. And since .NET 4.0's IComparable<T> will be contravariant in T, you will be able to use an IComparable<Turtle<T>> as an IComparable<T> because T : Turtle<T>. –  dahlbyk Sep 5 '09 at 19:40
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There is no use that I can see. Basically, it's the same as

public class Turtle
{
}
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1  
It's not the same because in the code given, Turtle cannot be instantiated. –  strager Sep 5 '09 at 2:53
1  
Yes it can... see Marc Gravell's comment here stackoverflow.com/questions/194484/… –  Thomas Levesque Sep 5 '09 at 2:58
    
@Levesque, And see RCIX's comment following. –  strager Sep 5 '09 at 3:01
    
My question is where does it have any use? –  RCIX Sep 5 '09 at 3:15
    
Something just occured to me. You can subclass Turtle and instantiate that but you can't instantiate a copy of Turtle itself. –  RCIX Sep 5 '09 at 3:32
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