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I'm parsing some data to display in a graph, yet I consistently get NaN when I parse my integers. I know that generally means that they're not parsed correctly, but I'm using parseint and I thought that would fix things. I'm parsing the Unixtime (first field) and then three other fields (correctly parsed). Yet, whenever I go to display the Unixtime it fails. I've declared scale.linear for x, though time.scale also fails.

The code snippet I'm using is below:

d3.tsv("<?php echo $field; ?>values.tsv", function(error, data) {
  color.domain(d3.keys(data[0]).filter(function(key) { return key !== "Unixtime"; }));
  data.forEach(function(d) {
    d.Unixtime = parseInt(d.Unixtime/1000);
  });
  var cities = color.domain().map(function(name) {
    return {
      name: name,
      values: data.map(function(d) {
        return {Unixtime: d.Unixtime, value: parseFloat(d[name]/1000)};
      })
    };
  });

The error message I'm getting is below from the Chrome debugger.

Error: Problem parsing d="MNaN,1.7527908403982337CNaN,1.7527908403982337,NaN,1.7527908403982337,NaN,1.751122428294669CNaN

The data looks like:

1353168433      5557    6404    5510

1353175632      5478    6404    5510

1353182750      5432    6404    5510
share|improve this question
2  
So, what does console.log(d.Unixtime) produce right before you parseInt() it? – Álvaro González Dec 11 '12 at 15:31
1  
And why are you bothering to parseFloat something after dividing it by 1000? – Ryan O'Hara Dec 11 '12 at 15:31
2  
Maybe instead of parseInt(d.Unixtime/1000), you need parseInt(d.Unixtime)/1000. Divide after parsing the int. – Joshua Dwire Dec 11 '12 at 15:33
    
What is the value of name? Are you sure it is an integer and not a String? – SteveS Dec 11 '12 at 15:35
    
@jdwire shouldn't matter: jsfiddle.net/K67vG his d.Unixtime must not be parse-able. – jbabey Dec 11 '12 at 15:50
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is this line:

d.Unixtime = parseInt(d.Unixtime/1000);

When you divide it by 1000, you get a decimal number. Try parseFloat() instead:

d.Unixtime = parseFloat(d.Unixtime/1000);

Alternatively you could /1000 after converting to int:

d.Unixtime = parseInt(d.Unixtime)/1000;
share|improve this answer
    
While I agree that I should have been doing that outside, moving it to the outside, parsing it as any of those does not fix the problem. Thanks for pointing out that poor syntax. – jyaworski Dec 11 '12 at 15:58

It turns out that console.log(d.Unixtime) as per Alvaro's suggestion printed undefined. With that, I went back in and noticed that the name of the field was somehow changed to time, rather than unixtime. After changing it, it works. Thanks everyone!

d3.tsv("<?php echo $field; ?>values.tsv", function(error, data) {
  color.domain(d3.keys(data[0]).filter(function(key) { return key !== "time"; }));
  data.forEach(function(d) {
    d.Unixtime = parseInt(d.time,10)/1000;
  });
  var cities = color.domain().map(function(name) {
    return {
      name: name,
      values: data.map(function(d) {
        return {time: d.time, value: parseFloat(d[name],10)/1000};
      })
    };
  });
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