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I created a custom user model by inheriting from django.contrib.auth.models.User, and added it to my admin. When I create an instance from MyUser admin, I have two (related) problems:

1- in the admin, the plain password (not uncrypted) is shown in the password field

2- when I try to login in my admin with an instance of MyUser, I get

Unknown password hashing algorithm '<mypassword>'. Did you specify it in the PASSWORD_HASHERS setting    

is it a bug? how can I fix that? (I'm using Django 1.4.2)

models.py

from django.contrib.auth.models import User

class MyUser(User):
    number = models.IntegerField()

admin.py

class MyUserAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    pass

admin.site.register(MyUser, MyUserAdmin)

EDIT

With the following the password is set properly, but when I want to modify some MyUser instance from the admin, the password is cleared and I have to set it again:

class MyUserAdminForm(forms.ModelForm):

    class Meta:
        model = MyUser

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(MyUserAdminForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.fields['password'].widget = forms.PasswordInput()

    def save(self, commit=True):
        user = super(MyUserAdminForm, self).save(commit=False)
        user.set_password(self.cleaned_data["password"])
        if commit:
            user.save()
        return user


class MyUserAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    form = MyUserAdminForm


admin.site.register(MyUser, MyUserAdmin)
share|improve this question
1  
How are you creating a new user? Can you show us that code –  TheLifeOfSteve Dec 11 '12 at 16:30
    
No code: I add the instance from MyUser admin, at <myurl>/admin/<myapp>/myuser/add/ –  jul Dec 11 '12 at 16:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is happening because you have not set the password properly on the form.

Django auth user passwords should be set using the set_password() method https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/auth/#django.contrib.auth.models.User.set_password

Usually the save method on the User admin form takes care of this, but since you have created your own form you have to do this yourself. This is an example of the save method you need on your admin form:

def save(self, commit=True):
    user = super(UserCreationForm, self).save(commit=False)
    user.set_password(self.cleaned_data["password"])
    if commit:
        user.save()
    return user

Edit: Although this is the reason you are having this error, I agree with Steve that you should use User Profiles and the instructions found here: https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.4/topics/auth/#storing-additional-information-about-users

OR if you can wait until django 1.5 comes out it has a configurable user model: https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/releases/1.5-beta-1/#configurable-user-model

Edit 2: Here is exactly what you need to save with the correct password:

forms.py

class MyUserAdminForm(forms.ModelForm):
    password1 = forms.CharField(widget=forms.PasswordInput)

    class Meta:
        model = MyUser

    def save(self, commit=True):
        user = super(MyUserAdminForm, self).save(commit=False)
        user.set_password(self.cleaned_data["password"])
        if commit:
            user.save()
        return user

admin.py

class MyUserAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    form = MyUserAdminForm

admin.site.register(MyUser, MyUserAdmin)
share|improve this answer
    
The form seems also inherited from django.contrib.auth.models.User (I get the same as for User, except this password issue), so I'm not sure why I should override the way the password is set. Still seems a bug to me. As I commented to Steve, inheriting directly from User seems cleaner to me, mostly because it makes it easier to customize the admin. But if this does not work, I'll have no choice... –  jul Dec 11 '12 at 17:21
    
The admin form has not been inherited, I can see from your code. What you need to do is change this: class MyUserAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin): fields = ('username', 'password', 'number', 'first_name', 'last_name') admin.site.register(MyUser, MyUserAdmin) To something like this: class MyUserAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin): form = MyUserAdminForm admin.site.register(MyUser, MyUserAdmin) and have the save method I showed above in your MyUserAdminForm class. –  Kevin Dec 11 '12 at 17:27
    
If I leave MyUser admin untouched by replacing fields = ('username', 'password', 'number', 'first_name', 'last_name') by pass (I've just edited my question), I get the model form of django.contrib.auth.models.User with all the fields, so it seems to be inherited. –  jul Dec 11 '12 at 17:33
1  
No that is just a regular dynamic model admin form that is created by the django admin. You need a customised form that has the save model in my original answer. This should give you more info - docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/contrib/admin/… –  Kevin Dec 11 '12 at 17:53
    
I have edited my original answer to show you exactly what I mean with code. –  Kevin Dec 11 '12 at 18:02

I would suggest you take a slightly different approach to extending the User class.

Django uses User Profiles as an easy way to store additional information about users.

You could do a one to one field in your new class that would allow the information to be linked to only one user.

class MyUser(User):
    user = models.OneToOneField(User)

    #additional fields
    number = models.IntegerField()

Documentation can be found here - to allow you to use this in the admin section as well

share|improve this answer
    
I guess you mean class MyUser(models.Model). I'm aware of this but it seems cleaner to me to directly inherit my model from django.contrib.auth.models.User, especially from the admin point of view. –  jul Dec 11 '12 at 17:09

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