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I have the following in code to convert from UTF-8 to ISO-8859-1 in a jar file and when I execute this jar in Windows I get one result and in CentOS I get another. Might anyone know why?

public static void main(String[] args) {

  try {

    String x = "Ä, ä, É, é, Ö, ö, Ü, ü, ß, «, »";

    Charset utf8charset = Charset.forName("UTF-8");
    Charset iso88591charset = Charset.forName("ISO-8859-1");

    ByteBuffer inputBuffer = ByteBuffer.wrap(x.getBytes());
    CharBuffer data = utf8charset.decode(inputBuffer);

    ByteBuffer outputBuffer = iso88591charset.encode(data);
    byte[] outputData = outputBuffer.array();

    String z = new String(outputData);

    System.out.println(z);
  }
  catch(Exception e) {
    System.out.println(e.getMessage());
  }
}

In Windows, java -jar test.jar > test.txt creates a file containing: Ä, ä, É, é, Ö, ö, Ü, ü, ß, «, »

but in CentOS I get: �?, ä, �?, é, �?, ö, �?, ü, �?, «, »

share|improve this question
    
The � character represents an unprintable character (see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specials_%28Unicode_block%29) perhaps your CentOS encoding is different then Windows? –  Robert H Dec 11 '12 at 17:02
    
What is it that you are really trying to do? Why do you have "Ä, ä, É, é, Ö, ö, Ãœ, ü, ß, «, »"; that needs to be converted if you could just have "Ä, ä, É, é, Ö, ö, Ü, ü, ß, «, »" that needs no conversion at all? If these are not string literals in your source file, then you need to provide more details. –  Esailija Dec 11 '12 at 17:37

3 Answers 3

These two lines

x.getBytes());

String z = new String(outputData);

are platform and default encoding specific.


This runs as expect on Windows and Linux by avoiding platform specific conversions.

String x = "Ä, ä, É, é, Ö, ö, Ü, ü, ß, «, »";

Charset utf8charset = Charset.forName("UTF-8");
Charset iso88591charset = Charset.forName("ISO-8859-1");

ByteBuffer inputBuffer = ByteBuffer.wrap(x.getBytes(utf8charset));
CharBuffer data = utf8charset.decode(inputBuffer);

ByteBuffer outputBuffer = iso88591charset.encode(data);
byte[] outputData = outputBuffer.array();

String z = new String(outputData, iso88591charset);

System.out.println(z);

prints

Ä, ä, É, é, Ö, ö, Ü, ü, ß, «, »
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry but what is the point of this code? You already started with the correct end result and the code does absolutely nothing useful. It is exactly the same as System.out.println(x); right after declaring x –  Esailija Dec 11 '12 at 17:28
    
@Esailija Best to ask the OP that. The code starts with characters which are encoded back and forth to two different encodings. The only difference is that he has a pseudo-encded string which when called with getBytes() with the default encoding can be decoded with UTF-8. That is clearly platform dependant. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 11 '12 at 17:31
    
@Esailija: Maybe the bytes are being transmitted between apps. This is likely just example code that demonstrates the same problem within a single app. –  Remy Lebeau Dec 12 '12 at 0:49
    
@RemyLebeau I'm not following, this answer demonstrates precisely nothing. It has a string literal, that is then encoded as utf-8, and the result is decoded back in utf-8. I.E. a do nothing at all. After this, the same process is repeated, but with ISO-8859-1. Again, a complete no-operation (At best this operation specifically will lead to information loss but yea). No-operation is not platform specific. –  Esailija Dec 12 '12 at 1:16
1  
:P Anyway, I am usually in javascript room, if you want to discuss this some time. –  Esailija Dec 12 '12 at 8:55

Three possibilities spring to mind:

  • The encoding you're actually using for your source code may differ by platform
  • The encoding the compiler expects by default may differ by platform (you can specify it on the command line)
  • The platform default encoding used when you call x.getBytes() may differ by platform

It's not clear in what way you're trying to convert from UTF-8 to ISO-8859-1 - because your original data is actually just a String. You're treating the results of calling x.getBytes() as if it were UTF-8-encoded data, but it's just whatever the platform default is...

Likewise when you write:

String z = new String(outputData);

... that's using the platform default encoding. Don't do that.

You don't need the byte buffer stuff at all: just encode using text.getBytes(encoding) and decode using new String(data, encoding).

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You should first and foremost get the string in correct internal representation in java before even thinking about output. I.E. it should be that:

z.equals("Ä, ä, É, é, Ö, ö, Ü, ü, ß, «, »") == true

The above can be verified without any output encoding issues, because it simply prints true or false.

In Windows you already achieved this with

ByteBuffer inputBuffer = ByteBuffer.wrap(x.getBytes());
CharBuffer data = utf8charset.decode(inputBuffer);

Because all you need to go from "Ä, ä, É, é, Ö, ö, Ãœ, ü, ß, «, »" to "Ä, ä, É, é, Ö, ö, Ü, ü, ß, «, »" is:

ByteBuffer inputBuffer = ByteBuffer.wrap(x.getBytes( windows1252/*explicit windows1252 works on CentOS too*/));
CharBuffer data = utf8charset.decode(inputBuffer);

After this you do something with ISO-8859-1, which is futile because barely half the characters in your original string can be represented in ISO-8859-1 not to mention you are already done as per above. You can delete the code after utf8charset.decode(inputBuffer)

So now your code could look like:

String x = "Ä, ä, É, é, Ö, ö, Ü, ü, ß, «, »";

Charset windows1252 = Charset.forName("Windows-1252");
Charset utf8charset = Charset.forName("UTF-8");

byte[] bytes = x.getBytes(windows1252);
String z = new String(bytes, utf8charset);

                                //Still wondering why you didn't just have this literal to begin with
                                //Check that the strings are internally equal so you know at least that
                                //the code is working

System.out.println(z.equals( "Ä, ä, É, é, Ö, ö, Ü, ü, ß, «, »")); 
System.out.println(z);
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