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Why does oracle always parse below query ?

select MY_SEQUENCE_SEQ.nextval
from dual

SGA statistics from Quest SQL Optimizer (8.6.0):

Executions : 83630

Parse_calls: 83630

Sequence details:

  • Last Cached Value: 1
  • Increment by: 1
  • Cache Size: 20
  • Cycle: No
  • Order: No

Test scenario:

  1. Create sequencer:

    CREATE SEQUENCE MY_SEQUENCE_SEQ
      START WITH 1
      MAXVALUE 999999999999999999999999999
      MINVALUE 1
      NOCYCLE
      CACHE 20
      NOORDER;
    
  2. Execute this query on user that has accces to v$sql view.

    select executions, 
           parse_calls 
      from v$sql 
     where sql_text like 'select MY_SEQ%';`
    
  3. Execute the query with sequence n times

  4. Execute query from point 2.

The result gained:

EXECUTIONS  - n
PARSE_CALSS - n

Tested on:

Databse: Oracle Database 10g Release 10.2.0.4.0 - 64bit Production

Client: Toad Version 11.5.1.2

share|improve this question
    
It doesn't work that way for me. create sequence my_sequencer;, then run SELECT MY_SEQUENCER.nextval FROM dual; multiple times, and in select executions, parse_calls, v$sql.* from v$sql where lower(sql_text) like '%my_sequencer%'; the executions increase but the parse_calls stay low. You may need to create a fully reproducible test case for us to debug the issue. –  Jon Heller Dec 11 '12 at 18:47
    
I mean can you provide the DDL for the sequence, and the SQL to get the Executions and Parse_calls, and exactly how you call the SELECT? Right now I can't reproduce your problem. It might depend on the context of the SELECT - is it called from a PL/SQL block, dynamic SQL, etc. –  Jon Heller Dec 11 '12 at 19:03
    
@jonearles, I have done the test manually, but it resolved the same same result that quencer was parsed. Some new thougths ? –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Dec 11 '12 at 19:29
    
@jonearles, After some anaylis i have notcied that this is quete common behavior. So my question is how did you teste so you have got different result ? –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Dec 11 '12 at 19:37
    
Is select value from v$parameter where name = 'session_cached_cursors'; set to 0? –  Jon Heller Dec 11 '12 at 19:53

2 Answers 2

This is not an Oracle fault, its just the way TOAD is sending SQL to oracle. ie toad doesn't cache the statement handle to oracle, it just closes it on completion.

Oracle will do one of three main things to a query when its sent to the SQL engine.

  1. hard parse it
  2. soft parse it
  3. not parse it

ie we want to be at case 3 and we certainly don't want to be at case 1! so when will each case happen?

a hard parse will occur when the SQL is not in the shared pool at all or the SQL is in the shared pool but the bind varilables / literals in use mean that the current SQL is not usable. for example lets say we issued this SQL three times select MY_SEQUENCE_SEQ.nextval from dual. This will hard parse the first time Oracle sees this SQL and puts it into the shared pool, and will soft parse on the 2nd and 3rd calls. We can see this happen easily:

SQL> select n.name, s.value from v$mystat s, v$statname n where n.statistic# = s.statistic# and n.name in ('parse count (hard)', 'parse count (total)');

NAME                      VALUE
-------------------- ----------
parse count (total)         522
parse count (hard)          287

SQL> select /* test1 */ MY_SEQUENCE_SEQ.nextval
  2  from dual;

   NEXTVAL
----------
        62

SQL> select /* test1 */ MY_SEQUENCE_SEQ.nextval
  2  from dual;

   NEXTVAL
----------
        63

SQL> select /* test1 */ MY_SEQUENCE_SEQ.nextval
  2  from dual;

   NEXTVAL
----------
        64

SQL> select n.name, s.value from v$mystat s, v$statname n where n.statistic# = s.statistic# and n.name in ('parse count (hard)', 'parse count (total)');

NAME                      VALUE
-------------------- ----------
parse count (total)         526
parse count (hard)          288

SQL> select sql_text, executions, parse_calls from v$sql where sql_text like 'select /* test1 */%';

SQL_TEXT                       EXECUTIONS PARSE_CALLS
------------------------------ ---------- -----------
select /* test1 */ MY_SEQUENCE          3           3
_SEQ.nextval from dual

hard parses ticked up by one and the sql has registered 3 parses, so 1 hard parse (to put it into the shared pool) and 2 soft parses.

why did it soft parse? in order for "no parse" to happen, the client code has to keep hold of the statement handle and just re-execute it. i.e. if we were writing this in Java we would write this:

    public static int getNextSeq(String str)
  throws Exception 
    {
        if (sel == null)
      {
        sel = con.prepareStatement("select MY_SEQUENCE_SEQ.nextval v from dual "+str);
      }
    ResultSet rs = sel.executeQuery();
    int seqVal=0;
    while (rs.next()) 
    {
      seqVal = rs.getInt("V");
    }
    return seqVal;
    }

i.e. we only call PrepareStatement if we havent already done this. if we execute this code with

System.out.println(getNextSeq(args[0]));
System.out.println(getNextSeq(args[0]));
System.out.println(getNextSeq(args[0]));

we can see this in action:

SQL> host java Prep two
70
71
72

SQL> select sql_text, executions, parse_calls from v$sql where sql_text like 'select %two';

SQL_TEXT                       EXECUTIONS PARSE_CALLS
------------------------------ ---------- -----------
select MY_SEQUENCE_SEQ.nextval          3           1
 v from dual two

now oracle DIDN'T parse the SQL apart from the 1 hard parse. If the Java code was instead written poorly, we'd see this:

sel = con.prepareStatement("select MY_SEQUENCE_SEQ.nextval v from dual "+str);
ResultSet rs = sel.executeQuery();


SQL> host java Prep three
73
74
75

SQL> select sql_text, executions, parse_calls from v$sql where sql_text like 'select %three';

SQL_TEXT                       EXECUTIONS PARSE_CALLS
------------------------------ ---------- -----------
select MY_SEQUENCE_SEQ.nextval          3           3
 v from dual three

and now we see the parse count = executions. in other words we are soft parsing each call which isn't ideal. again NOT an Oracle limitation, just poor client implementation.

with PL/SQL we DON'T have to worry about this. Why? PL/SQL does not parse either as its optimized a lot for running SQL (unsuprisingly!). eg:

SQL> declare
  2    v_seq number;
  3  begin
  4    for idx in 1..3 loop
  5      select MY_SEQUENCE_SEQ.nextval into v_seq from dual pls_test;
  6    end loop;
  7  end;
  8  /

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL> select sql_text, executions, parse_calls from v$sql where sql_text like 'SELECT %PLS_TEST';

SQL_TEXT                       EXECUTIONS PARSE_CALLS
------------------------------ ---------- -----------
SELECT MY_SEQUENCE_SEQ.NEXTVAL          3           1
 FROM DUAL PLS_TEST

now, there is one caveat to pl/sql doing this optimization for us, and that is the parameter SESSION_CACHED_CURSORS. in a given session, Oracle will hold open a set of cursors for us (ie they are soft open, that is if we need more cursors it will close them). so if we had SESSION_CACHED_CURSORS=0 and repeat the above test, we will see soft parses all of a sudden creep in:

SQL> alter session set session_cached_cursors=0;

Session altered.

SQL> declare
  2    v_seq number;
  3  begin
  4    for idx in 1..3 loop
  5      select MY_SEQUENCE_SEQ.nextval into v_seq from dual pls_test2;
  6    end loop;
  7  end;
  8  /

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL> select sql_text, executions, parse_calls from v$sql where sql_text like 'SELECT %PLS_TEST2';

SQL_TEXT                       EXECUTIONS PARSE_CALLS
------------------------------ ---------- -----------
SELECT MY_SEQUENCE_SEQ.NEXTVAL          3           3
 FROM DUAL PLS_TEST2

obviously, the higher the value of cached cursors, the more opertuntity we have to avoid soft parsing and reach the holy grail of avoid parsing alltogether.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice answer. But it's worth noting that for /* test 1*/, on 11.2.0.3, EXECUTIONS = PARSE_CALLS only until the 3rd execution. After that the statement is not parsed anymore, using SQL*Plus or other clients like Toad. –  Jon Heller Dec 27 '12 at 6:56

It depends how you handle statements on client side. If you keep same variable/handler you should not have parse on each call.


If you create and free your statement on each call, you can expect that sql should either be searched and found in shared pool (soft parse) or recompiled (hard parse).
Also your underlining platform can cache on it's level - to avoid soft parsing. Also there is server parameter file to size cached session cursors.

share|improve this answer
    
Ad.1 There is no variable in the qurey. Ad.2 The parse is incremented even if the select was send in signle batch. Ad3. this do not have anyhignt to do with the question. –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Dec 11 '12 at 19:36

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