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I am attempting to create a game of Paper Scissors Stone using Haskell to practice my understanding of it.

Unfortunately, the source code below gives unwanted answers.

For example:

>play pStone pRandom 1
1 games were played. Player 1 won 1 and player 2 won 1, making the match a draw.

If 1 game is played, there should only be either 1 or 0 wins.

>play pStone pCopy 100
100 games were played. Player 1 won 1 and player 2 won 1, making the match a draw.

If 100 games are played, where (after the first round) both play the same move, there should only be either 1 or 0 wins.

>play pCopy pAntiCopy 100
100 games were played. Player 1 won 31 and player 2 won 37, making player 2 the overall winner.

By the intended definitions of pCopy and pAntiCopy, pAntiCopy should win either 99 or 100 and pCopy should win 0 or 1.

I believe the most likely reason for this behaviour is that the random numbers are evaluated at the end, meaning that 2 values which are supposed to rely upon the same random number instead rely on 2 separate random numbers. Am I correct in the above?

If I am correct, please could you advise me on how I should correct this? If I am incorrect, please could you tell me what the problem is and how it should be resolved?

I have read a solution to a separate problem which suggests generating a list of random numbers and then using them, passing them as arguments to the relevant functions from a main function. I do not believe this would work that well here, though, as the number of random numbers needed could be anything from 0 to 2*numRounds, dependent on the plans being used (I intend to create more advanced plans when this is working) and the readability of the code would further decrease.

I am new to Haskell and functional programming in general, so I apologise for the style of the source code below. If you have any suggestions on how it could be improved, they are also most welcome.

import System.Random

data Move= Paper|Scissors|Stone deriving Show
type Plan=([IO Move]->[IO Move]->IO Move)

play :: Plan -> Plan -> Integer -> IO ()
play plan1 plan2 numRounds=do p1intwins<-p1wins;p2intwins<-p2wins;putStr(show numRounds ++ " games were played. Player 1 won " ++ show p1intwins ++ " and player 2 won " ++ show p2intwins ++ ", making " ++ (if p1intwins > p2intwins then "player 1 the overall winner." else (if p1intwins < p2intwins then "player 2 the overall winner." else "the match a draw."))) where (_, _, _, _, _, _, p1wins, p2wins)=(playRound (plan1, plan2, numRounds,[],[], 0, return 0, return 0))

playRound :: (Plan, Plan, Integer, [IO Move], [IO Move], Integer, IO Integer, IO Integer) -> (Plan, Plan, Integer, [IO Move], [IO Move], Integer, IO Integer, IO Integer)
playRound (plan1, plan2, numRounds, p1moves, p2moves, elapsedRounds, p1wins, p2wins)=if elapsedRounds==numRounds then (plan1, plan2, numRounds, p1moves, p2moves, elapsedRounds, p1wins, p2wins) else (playRound (plan1, plan2, numRounds, p1moves++[p1move], p2moves++[p2move], elapsedRounds+1, do p1win<-beatsCaller p1move p2move;p1intwins<-p1wins;return (p1intwins+if p1win then 1 else 0), do p2win<-beatsCaller p2move p1move;p2intwins<-p2wins;return(p2intwins+(if p2win then 1 else 0)) )) where p1move=plan1 p1moves p2moves; p2move=plan2 p2moves p1moves

beatsCaller :: IO Move -> IO Move -> IO Bool
beatsCaller iom1 iom2=do m1<-iom1;m2<-iom2;return(beats m1 m2)

beats :: Move -> Move -> Bool
beats Scissors Paper=True
beats Stone Scissors=True
beats Paper Stone=True
beats _ _=False

--                                           ###############Plans###################
pStone :: Plan
pStone _ _ = return Stone

pScissors :: Plan
pScissors _ _ = return Scissors

pPaper :: Plan
pPaper _ _ = return Paper

pUScissors :: Plan
pUScissors [] _ = randomMove
pUScissors _ _ = return Scissors

pCopy :: Plan
pCopy _ []= randomMove
pCopy _ theirMoves= last theirMoves

pRandom :: Plan
pRandom _ _=randomMove

pAntiCopy :: Plan
pAntiCopy [] _ = randomMove
pAntiCopy ourMoves _ = do ourMove<-last ourMoves;return(beaterOf ourMove)

--                                           ##############Plan Logic###############

beaterOf ::  Move -> Move
beaterOf Scissors = Stone
beaterOf Paper = Scissors
beaterOf Stone = Paper

randomMove :: IO Move
randomMove=do x<-genRandom;return (doRMove x)

doRMove:: Int -> Move
doRMove rand
    |rand==1 =Paper
    |rand==2 =Scissors
    |rand==3 =Stone

genRandom :: IO Int
genRandom =getStdRandom (randomR (1,3))
share|improve this question
4  
You could make it much easier for people looking at your problem if you reformatted your code for play and playRound. They're extremely hard to read at the moment. –  us2012 Dec 11 '12 at 18:48
1  
I'm still getting used to the ammount of whitespace expected for spliting functions across multiple lines and am usually leaving it until I've got it working properly. I've had bad experiences where I spent a long time re-reading my code to find why an error occurs before realising I'd made a tiny mistake in whitespacing. You're completely correct that I should have done this before I submitted it for help, though, so I apologise again for my poor style. –  Sepia Dec 12 '12 at 16:50
    
I wasn't critizising you, it was just a hint to help you get more answers :) Your question is a good one, and it prompted two great answers. –  us2012 Dec 13 '12 at 1:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I've slightly reformatted and annotated your source file. The essential point is that you should change the type of Plan to be [Move] -> [Move] -> IO Move, as explained below.

import System.Random

data Move = Paper | Scissors | Stone
  deriving (Show, Eq, Enum, Bounded)

-- Make Move an instance of Random, so that we can use randomIO
-- in order to pick a random Move rather than a hand-written
-- function. We use the derived Enum instance and integer random
-- numbers to do the hard work for us.
instance Random Move where
  randomR (l, u) g = (toEnum n, g')
    where (n, g') = randomR (fromEnum l, fromEnum u) g
  random = randomR (minBound, maxBound)

-- Unchanged, just realigned.
beaterOf :: Move -> Move
beaterOf Scissors = Stone
beaterOf Paper    = Scissors
beaterOf Stone    = Paper

-- Reimplemented in terms of beaterOf, to avoid unnecessary
-- duplication of error-prone information.
beats :: Move -> Move -> Bool
beats x y = x == beaterOf y

-- Most important change. A plan is a strategy that takes two
-- lists of past moves. These are of type Move, not IO Move, as
-- they have already happened. We then have to determine a new
-- one. Here, to choose the next, we allow IO (such as picking
-- a random number, or asking a human player). I also reverse
-- the order of moves, so that the most recent moves are first,
-- because most strategies access the most recent move, and
-- accessing the head is more efficient in a list.
type Plan =  [Move]  -- my moves, latest move first
          -> [Move]  -- opponent's moves, latest move first
          -> IO Move -- my next move, may involve IO

--
-- Specific plans (slightly renamed, otherwise unchanged):
--

-- Always plays a particular move.
always :: Move -> Plan
always m _ _ = return m

-- Copies the latest move of opponent.
copy :: Plan
copy _ []           = randomIO
copy _ (latest : _) = return latest

randomly :: Plan
randomly _ _ = randomIO

-- Moves to the beater of our previous move.
antiCopy :: Plan
antiCopy []           _ = randomIO
antiCopy (latest : _) _ = return (beaterOf latest)

uScissors :: Plan
uScissors [] _ = randomIO
uScissors _  _ = return Scissors

-- Play wrapper. Interface as before.
play :: Plan    -- my plan
     -> Plan    -- opponent's plan
     -> Integer -- number of rounds to be played
     -> IO ()   -- output is printed as text
play myPlan opPlan rounds = do
  (myWins, opWins) <- playRounds
                        myPlan opPlan rounds
                        [] [] -- initialize with empty move lists
                        0 0   -- and 0 wins each
  -- print statistics
  let overallStatus | myWins > opWins = "Player 1 the overall winner"
                    | opWins > myWins = "Player 2 the overall winner"
                    | otherwise       = "the match a draw"
  putStrLn $ show rounds ++ " games were played. "
          ++ "Player 1 won " ++ show myWins ++ " and "
          ++ "Player 2 won " ++ show opWins ++ ", making "
          ++ overallStatus ++ "."

-- Does all the hard work.
playRounds :: Plan    -- my plan
           -> Plan    -- opponent's plan
           -> Integer -- number of rounds still to be played
           -> [Move]  -- our moves so far, latest first
           -> [Move]  -- opponent's moves so far, latest first
           -> Int     -- my wins
           -> Int     -- opponent's wins
           -> IO (Int, Int)  -- final wins
playRounds _      _      0      _       _       myWins opWins =
  return (myWins, opWins) -- if no rounds are left to play, return the final statistics
playRound myPlan opPlan rounds myMoves opMoves myWins opWins = do
  myMove <- myPlan myMoves opMoves -- here's where a random number might get chosen
  opMove <- opPlan opMoves myMoves -- and here again (but nowhere else)
  let myWin = myMove `beats` opMove -- this works on the already chosen Move, not on IO Move
      opWin = opMove `beats` myMove -- dito
  playRound
    myPlan opPlan      -- as before
    (rounds - 1)       -- one round is played
    (myMove : myMoves) -- adding moves in front of the list is easier
    (opMove : opMoves)
    (fromEnum myWin + myWins) -- update win count, turning True to 1 and False to 0
    (fromEnum opWin + opWins)
share|improve this answer
    
+1, that's some neat code! –  us2012 Dec 11 '12 at 20:31
    
Thank-you very much for the thorough re-write of my source code. It shows me both where I went wrong and where I should improve my style. I haven't used instance declarations before, but your answer prompted me to look them up - a great outcome of a learning exercise. I think I will need a little experimentation to fully understand how they can work in this context and others. I really appreciate the length of time it must have taken to fix, improve and annotate my code. –  Sepia Dec 12 '12 at 17:15

I believe the most likely reason for this behaviour is that the random numbers are evaluated at the end, meaning that 2 values which are supposed to rely upon the same random number instead rely on 2 separate random numbers. Am I correct in the above?

You are. Since you are not actually playing during the iteration, but passing IO-actions, your strategies don't have plain Moves - the result of the previous rounds - to build on, but the recipes to generate a Move, which in several cases involves executing genRandom to obtain a Move. Each time that in

ourMove<-last ourMoves

last ourMoves involves a genRandom, a new (pseudo) random number is produced - often a different one than the one producing the previous Move.

If I am correct, please could you advise me on how I should correct this?

Don't pass IO actions and lists of IO-actions around that use genRandom. You need the pure values to determine the strategies (except for pRandom and the initial choices in pCopy and pAntiCopy).

Run the pseudo-random number generation in each step where necessary, and pass the pure Moves obtained to the next iteration.


Also, use shorter lines, use whitespace, and use layout to make the code more readable.

I'm going to rewrite it in a more idiomatic style, but I'm a slow typist, so it can take a while.

Okay, it's still a bit cluttered, since I kept a lot of the original output and logic, but it's much easier to read and follow, and it produces the expected output:

module Rocks where

import System.Random

data Move
    = Paper
    | Scissors
    | Stone
      deriving Show

type Plan = [Move] -> [Move] -> IO Move

play :: Plan -> Plan -> Int -> IO ()
play plan1 plan2 numRounds = do
    (wins1, wins2) <- playRounds plan1 plan2 numRounds [] [] 0 0
    putStrLn $ show numRounds ++ " games were played. Player 1 won "
                ++ show wins1 ++ " and player 2 won " ++ show wins2
                ++ ", making " ++ result wins1 wins2
  where
    result a b
        | a == b    = "the match a draw."
        | otherwise = "player " ++ (if a > b then "1" else "2") ++ " the overall winner."

playRounds :: Plan -> Plan -> Int -> [Move] -> [Move] -> Int -> Int -> IO (Int, Int)
playRounds _     _     0      _      _      wins1 wins2 = return (wins1,wins2)
playRounds plan1 plan2 rounds moves1 moves2 wins1 wins2 = do
    choice1 <- plan1 moves1 moves2
    choice2 <- plan2 moves2 moves1
    let (w1, w2)
            | beats choice1 choice2 = (wins1+1 ,wins2)
            | beats choice2 choice1 = (wins1, wins2+1)
            | otherwise             = (wins1, wins2)
    playRounds plan1 plan2 (rounds-1) (moves1 ++ [choice1]) (moves2 ++ [choice2]) w1 w2

beats :: Move -> Move -> Bool
beats Scissors  Paper       = True
beats Stone     Scissors    = True
beats Paper     Stone       = True
beats _         _           = False

--       ###############Plans###################

pStone :: Plan
pStone _ _ = return Stone

pScissors :: Plan
pScissors _ _ = return Scissors

pPaper :: Plan
pPaper _ _ = return Paper

pUScissors :: Plan
pUScissors [] _ = randomMove
pUScissors _  _ = return Scissors

pCopy :: Plan
pCopy _ []         = randomMove
pCopy _ theirMoves = return $ last theirMoves

pRandom :: Plan
pRandom _ _ = randomMove

pAntiCopy :: Plan
pAntiCopy []       _ = randomMove
pAntiCopy ourMoves _ = return (beaterOf $ last ourMoves)

--       ##############Plan Logic###############

beaterOf ::  Move -> Move
beaterOf Scissors   = Stone
beaterOf Paper      = Scissors
beaterOf Stone      = Paper

randomMove :: IO Move
randomMove = fmap doRMove genRandom

doRMove:: Int -> Move
doRMove rand
    | rand == 1 = Paper
    | rand == 2 = Scissors
    | rand == 3 = Stone
    | otherwise = error "oops"

genRandom :: IO Int
genRandom = getStdRandom (randomR (1,3))

with

*Rocks> play pCopy pAntiCopy 100
100 games were played. Player 1 won 0 and player 2 won 99, making player 2 the overall winner.
*Rocks> play pStone pRandom 100
100 games were played. Player 1 won 33 and player 2 won 34, making player 2 the overall winner.
*Rocks> play pStone pCopy 100
100 games were played. Player 1 won 1 and player 2 won 0, making player 1 the overall winner.
*Rocks> play pStone pAntiCopy 100
100 games were played. Player 1 won 33 and player 2 won 33, making the match a draw.
share|improve this answer
    
Thank-you very much for fixing my code and directly answering my questions. I have not used the fmap function before, although I have read about it. I have struggled a little in trying to understand it, but I shall now have another look at it. I really appreciate the length of time it must have taken to correct my code. –  Sepia Dec 12 '12 at 17:14

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