Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create a plot in ggplot2. Here are the data, named problem_accept_df:

Order Application probscore
1  Integrated 0.8333333
1      Tabbed 0.7777778
2  Integrated 0.8965517
2      Tabbed 0.7777778
3  Integrated 0.7931034
3      Tabbed 0.7777778
4  Integrated       0.7
4      Tabbed 0.6538462
5  Integrated 0.9285714
5      Tabbed 0.8333333
6  Integrated 0.9310345
6      Tabbed 0.8148148
7  Integrated 0.8571429
7      Tabbed 0.8518519
8  Integrated 0.9333333
8      Tabbed 0.6923077
9  Integrated 0.9310345
9      Tabbed 0.8461538
10  Integrated 0.9285714
10      Tabbed       0.8

And here is the code to create the plot:

ggplot(problem_accept_df, aes(x=Order, y=probscore, color=Application,
group=Application)) + 
xlab('Order') +
ylab('Problem scores') +
geom_line(position=pd, size=2) +
geom_point(position=pd, size=4) +
labs(title='Acceptable proportion of problem scores')

The plot is created, but the y values are displayed on equally spaced tick marks even though the values are not equally spaced. The plot also displays every individual y value instead of a range. I've tried to change that (scale_y_continuous(breaks=seq(0.5, 1, 0.1))) but I get the error message Error: Discrete value supplied to continuous scale so the problem must be more basic. I would appreciate any suggestions about what to do.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

This usually happens if the data (in your case probscore) is a factor and not a continuous variable.

> d <- data.frame(x=c(0,1), y=factor(c(0.5, 1.5)))
> d
  x   y
1 0 0.5
2 1 1.5
> levels(d$x)
NULL
> levels(d$y)
[1] "0.5" "1.5"
> library(ggplot2)
> ggplot(d, aes(x=x, y=y)) + geom_point() + scale_y_continuous()
Error: Discrete value supplied to continuous scale
> ggplot(d, aes(x=x, y=as.numeric(as.character(y)))) + geom_point() + scale_y_continuous()
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks--this fixes the spacing but now it plots the values incorrectly. Better stick with qplot, I guess. –  user1895691 Dec 11 '12 at 22:48
    
@user1895691: What do you mean by "incorrectly"? –  krlmlr Dec 12 '12 at 7:24
    
I mean the points are in the wrong places. The final value for "Tabbed", for example, is 0.8, but the point appears at 0.85. –  user1895691 Dec 12 '12 at 15:48
    
ggplot plot what it finds in the data. What does as.numeric(as.character(problem_accept_df$probscore)) look like? –  krlmlr Dec 12 '12 at 16:22
    
as.numeric(as.character(problem_accept_df$probscore)) looks like the final column of the dataset, which is what I would expect. The last value is 0.80000000. –  user1895691 Dec 12 '12 at 20:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.