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I'm looking for something that mimics the REST API of SQS and is usable for robust/non-flaky, small, logic/unit tests.

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2 Answers 2

You can also try ElasticMQ, https://github.com/adamw/elasticmq, which implements the SQS interface and has both in-memory and db-backed storages.

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This is something I've been doing for a while now with a lot of success. If Gradle is your build system I've written a plugin to automatically launch it as part of the build: bit.ly/1sbLoff –  MrWiggles Sep 3 at 11:17

JMS and MSMQ both provide similar queueing infrastructure. Depending on your platform, you could use either of those technologies. Both are robust. MSMQ can provide an in-memory (non-transactional) queue in addition to a disk-backed, transactional queue.

RabbitMQ is another popular choice that should provide a superset of the SQS functionality. I don't have direct experience with it, however.

It should be fairly straightforward to create a wrapper that mimics the SQS interface.

UPDATE

ActiveMQ provides a REST API. However, the API is different than that of SQS.

You can either use that and wrap the API differences, or you can create a REST API of your own that exactly mirrors the SQS API and wraps any MQ system you wish.

http://activemq.apache.org/restful-queue.html

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I should've been clearer. I'm looking for something with the same REST API as SQS, something that is essentially a drop-in replacement for the purposes of unit tests. –  Noel Yap Dec 11 '12 at 21:35
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ActiveMQ offers a REST API (though a slightly different REST API than SQS). You can either use that and wrap the API differences, or you can create a REST API of your own that exactly mirrors the SQS API and wraps any MQ system you wish. –  Eric J. Dec 11 '12 at 22:33
    
The thing I'm trying to test is the wrapper. The idea is to have th e wrapper use the fake in unit tests (so as to make its tests robust and fast) and have full integration tests for the fake (to ensure that its behavior continues to be the same as the underlying service). –  Noel Yap Dec 12 '12 at 14:52

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