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How can I get GNU diff ignore the blank lines in the following example?

File a:

x
do

done

File b:

x

do
done

Neither file has trailing white spaces in any line.

Using GNU diff 3.1 on Mac OS X I get:

diff -w a b
2d1
< do
3a3
> do

Same when I add various promising looking options:

diff --suppress-blank-empty -E -b -w -B -I '^[[:space:]]*$' --strip-trailing-cr -i a b
2d1
< do
3a3
> do

What am I missing here?

diff --version
diff (GNU diffutils) 3.1
share|improve this question
    
I have the same problem/question. Neither -bBw or any of the full arguments is ignoring blank lines or white spaces. Did you come up with a solution yet? – Thomas Fankhauser Jun 10 '13 at 15:26
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the problem here is that diff is seeing do as being removed from the first file, and added to the second, maybe because there isn't enough context around the change.

If you reverse the order of the files as arguments, diff reports that the space is added and removed, and will then ignore it with --ignore-blanks-lines.

Looking at it as a unified diff, this is a little more clear:

$ diff test.txt test2.txt -u
--- test.txt    2015-10-20 10:50:52.585167600 -0700
+++ test2.txt   2015-10-20 10:51:01.042167600 -0700
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
 x
-do

+do
 done

prp@QW7PRP09-14 ~/temp
$ diff test2.txt test.txt -u
--- test2.txt   2015-10-20 10:51:01.042167600 -0700
+++ test.txt    2015-10-20 10:50:52.585167600 -0700
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
 x
-
 do
+
 done

And the result with the --ignore-blank-lines, and the order switched:

prp@QW7PRP09-14 ~/temp
$ diff test2.txt test.txt -B -u
share|improve this answer
    
Still seems odd that diff isn't independent of the order of the arguments, i.e., I'd expect that if diff a b is "no differences" then diff b a should say the same. – Robert Oct 20 '15 at 20:09

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