Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to append two arrays together. The first array {0, 1, 2} when appended to the second array {3, 4, 5} should yield {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5}. Let me show you what I have before I move on:

#include <iostream>

int main() {

    int i = 0;

    int arr1[] = {3, 4, 5}, arr2[] = {0, 1, 2};

    while (i < 3) {
        arr2[3 + i] = arr1[i];
        i++;
    }

    std::cout << std::endl;

    for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++) std::cout << arr2[i] << std::endl; // print

}

I think the way I implemented it is correct. But I find that when I print out the contents of the new array (arr2) this is what I get:

0
1
2
-1219315227
-1218166796
134514640

0, 1, 2 is the original array, but then 3, 4, 5 has some how been turned into these weird numbers. However, this is somehow fixed with I add an arbitrary std::cout statement here in the while loop:

...
while (i < 3) {
    std::cout << 5 << '\n'; // just a random #

    arr2[3 + i] = arr1[i];
    i++;
}
...

And I print the array once again and it works!:

5

0
1
2
3
4
5

My question is why is this working when I use a std::cout statement inside the while loop as opposed to not doing that, in which case it gives me those numbers?

EDIT:

So it turns out what I have here is undefined behavior. With that, my question still stands: why does my code work with an std::cout call inside the while loop?

share|improve this question
4  
You're indexing past the second arrays length. I think that's UB? – Borgleader Dec 11 '12 at 19:59
    
@Borgleader, Indeed it is. – chris Dec 11 '12 at 19:59
    
The easy way to do this is with std::vector. Just use insert. – chris Dec 11 '12 at 20:00
up vote 7 down vote accepted

You are going beyond the bounds of arr2 here:

while (i < 3) {
    arr2[3 + i] = arr1[i];
    i++;
}

arr2 has size 3. What you are doing is undefined behaviour. All observed behaviours are consistent with undefined behaviour.

share|improve this answer
    
My question was why does it print the correct numbers with std::cout inside the while loop. – 0x499602D2 Dec 11 '12 at 20:02
4  
@David because it is undefined behaviour. Anything can happen. – juanchopanza Dec 11 '12 at 20:04
    
Because it's undefined behavior. The shifted around stuff is working out of pure dumb luck, and may fail again at any time due to additional changes. Fix the error. – Donnie Dec 11 '12 at 20:05

When you declare your second array like so:

arr2[] = {0, 1, 2};

You are giving it a size of 3. Writing outside those bounds is undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
You're not answering the question. Why does it work when I put a std::cout statement inside the while loop. – 0x499602D2 Dec 11 '12 at 20:04
1  
It doesn't matter. Undefined behavior is undefined behavior. The compiler is free to do whatever it wishes. – Matt Kline Dec 11 '12 at 20:05
    
@David: Yes it does. Undefined behavior is surprise behavior. We can't tell you why it works because it's an accident. It's not guaranteed to work, it's just luck. – Borgleader Dec 11 '12 at 20:10

What you have here is Undefined behavior:

Problem is that arr2 is allocated for only 3 items, and you are writing after allocated space:

while (i < 3) {
    arr2[3 + i] = arr1[i];
    i++;
}

You need to allocate more space for array, or allocate it on heap, so you can use realloc function to change its size - or, even better, and more c++-ish - use std::vector<int>!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.