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When using the Facebook API and getting a story or Post with tags, the message_tags property (or story_tags) is a object of tags indexed by offset. Here is an example:

{
 . . .
      "message": "Dhiren Patel likes Marmot.",
      "message_tags": {
        "19": [
          {
            "id": 101961456410,
            "name": "Marmot",
            "offset": 19,
            "length": 6
          }
        ],
        "0": [
          {
            "id": 1207059,
            "name": "Dhiren Patel",
            "offset": 0,
            "length": 12
          }
        ]
      }, 
 . . .
}

This obviously works, but strikes me as unnecessarily verbose, since each tag already contains its offset in a property. Why does each tag have to be indexed by its offset? Wouldn't an equally valid format be to simply make message_tags and array of tags instead of an object, like this?

{
 . . .
      "message": "Dhiren Patel likes Marmot.",
      "message_tags": [
        {
          "id": 101961456410,
          "name": "Marmot",
          "offset": 19,
          "length": 6
        },
        {
          "id": 1207059,
          "name": "Dhiren Patel",
          "offset": 0,
          "length": 12
        }
      ], 
 . . .
}

If there some efficiency gain that justifies Facebook's format over this?

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Mysterious Ways … –  CBroe Dec 11 '12 at 23:01
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For convenience, I assume. The code below is in Javascript, but it could just as easily be true for Python and other languages.

First, message_tags isn't very useful as an ordered Array, because the order would probably have to be validated anyway, so any code would probably have to treat it like an unordered Array.

Objects make good alternatives to unordered Arrays, since each Object key could be a unique identifier for each entry. In this case it makes it easy to get the tag data when you already know the offset.

// Validate message_tags order, and create an ordered list of each offset.
var offsets = [];
for each (var tag in message_tags) {
  offsets.push(tag.offset);
}
offsets.sort();

// Process each tag.
for (var i = 0; i < offsets.length; i++) {
   var offset = offsets[i];
   var tag = message_tags[offset]; // Convenient!
   var length = tag.length;
   // ....
}
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This make sense. Thanks for your answer! –  cbrauchli Aug 15 '13 at 23:52
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I did some test and could not find your discovery of the prefixed message_tags. Please confirm. If so, your initial question is now invalid. If you have another scenario that triggered your observation, do share so that I can check your scenario.

{
  "id": "5940395639***",
  "from": {
    "name": "Ricky",
    "id": "70585***"
  },
  "message": "Ricky and Jack test",
  "message_tags": [
    {
      "id": "70585***",
      "name": "Ricky",
      "type": "user",
      "offset": 0,
      "length": 5
    },
    {
      "id": "100005***",
      "name": "Jack",
      "type": "user",
      "offset": 10,
      "length": 4
    }
  ],
  "can_remove": true,
  "created_time": "2013-06-14T08:41:24+0000",
  "like_count": 0,
  "user_likes": false
}
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