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I am parsing a very simple text file and manipulating it into an array. In my last step of the program I am trying to search for a user given term. I have tried many things but cannot seem to get it to work, my I search for a term that I know for a fact is in the array it still does not find it. I have a hunch that the variables might get tinkered with sometime during the "split", "chop", and "sort" functions but I am not exactly sure.

print "\n";
print "Enter a term you would like to search for: \n";

my $element = <STDIN>;

$num = grep(/$element/,@final);

if($num > 0){
print ("Term: " . $element . " found " . $num . " times. \n");
}else{
print "Not found. \n";
}

So I know for a fact that the term "apple" is in the list, when I search the term "apple" it prints that it was not found. Help please!!

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Is the user search term intended to be a regex? Shell-like pattern? Literal string match? Case sensitive? –  pilcrow Dec 11 '12 at 20:34
2  
Just chomp() the $element. It's got a newline at the end. –  Adam Zalcman Dec 11 '12 at 20:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should try

chomp(my $element = <STDIN>);

Because your standard input will have a trailing newline that otherwise gets matched in your search. E.g.:

$element = "foo\n";   
grep /$element/, "foo bar";  # will not match

You should also be aware that meta characters will be interpreted in your input. So for example, foo? will be considered "fo followed by an optional o". To avoid that you can use quotemeta or \Q ... \E, e.g. in your regex use:

/\Q$element\E/
share|improve this answer
    
Your response was extremely helpful to me in understanding how to use the chomp function. However upon deep inspection i discovered that I was searching for the term outside of the scope in which the array was declared. After moving a few curly braces the program was working perfectly. I was programing in command line and it was extremely hard to manage the formatting, which is why the problem occurred. I am use to programming java in netBeans which will format it for me. Again, thanks for you response, i did implement chomp in to my code so i greatly appreciate it! –  user1895814 Dec 11 '12 at 23:40
    
I believe netBeans has a perl plugin. You're welcome. If you feel the answer helped, you can accept it by clicking the check mark. –  TLP Dec 11 '12 at 23:43

Try doing this :

use Data::Dumper;

my @final = <DATA>;
chomp(@final);
print Dumper \@final;

print "Enter a term you would like to search for >>> ";
chomp(my $element = <STDIN>);

$num = grep { /$element/ } @final;

if ($num > 0){
    print("Term: $element found $num times\n");
}
else{
    print("Not found. \n");
}


__DATA__
foo
bar
base

NOTE

  • if you don't chomp(), you are trying to grep element\n instead of element
  • Data::Dumper is a great module to display any data (structures or not).
share|improve this answer
    
Your response was extremely helpful to me in understanding how to use the chomp function. However upon deep inspection i discovered that I was searching for the term outside of the scope in which the array was declared. After moving a few curly braces the program was working perfectly. I was programing in command line and it was extremely hard to manage the formatting, which is why the problem occurred. I am use to programming java in netBeans which will format it for me. Again, thanks for you response, i did implement chomp in to my code so i greatly appreciate it! –  user1895814 Dec 11 '12 at 22:54

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