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I have a query that outputs the following results when running on an SQL db

CreatedDate                 QuoteNumber NumberOfLicensedDrivers
2012-07-01 10:38:49.157 48641           0
2012-07-01 18:35:38.680 48650           2
2012-07-02 08:44:33.770 48670           1
2012-07-02 09:12:09.447 48700           0

I have simplified the query for the sake of this post, but it basically is:

SELECT DISTINCT
       CreatedDate,
       QuoteNumber,
       count([DriversLicense]) as NumberOfLicensedDrivers
FROM table1 LEFT OUTER JOIN table2 on table2.QuoteID = table1.ID 
WHERE CreatedDate > '7/1/2012'
GROUP BY QuoteNumber, CreatedDate 
ORDER BY CreatedDate ASC

This query gives me the expected output. I want all the quotes to show up in my output. If there are 0 drivers I want 0 to be shown. The issue is I need to create the same result in MS access with linked tables. The MS access output is not giving me the expected results.

Here is the query I use for MS ACCESS

SELECT DISTINCT 
     quote.CreatedDate, 
     quote.QuoteNumber, 
     count(quoteDrivers.DriversLicense) As NumberOfLicensedDrivers
FROM quote 
LEFT JOIN quoteDrivers ON quote.ID = quoteDrivers.QuoteID
WHERE (quote.CreatedDate>#7/1/2012#)
GROUP BY quote.CreatedDate, quote.QuoteNumber
ORDER BY quote.CreatedDate;

The output shows no licensed drivers:

CreatedDate            QuoteNumber  NumberOfLicensedDrivers
7/1/2012 10:38:49 AM   48641    0
7/1/2012 6:35:39 PM    48650    0
7/2/2012 8:44:34 AM    48670    0
7/2/2012 9:12:09 AM    48700    0

However when I add an additional WHERE clause against the quoteDrivers table:

SELECT DISTINCT 
    quote.CreatedDate, 
    quote.QuoteNumber, 
    count(quoteDrivers.DriversLicense) As NumberOfLicensedDrivers
FROM quote 
LEFT JOIN quoteDrivers ON quote.ID = quoteDrivers.QuoteID
WHERE (quote.CreatedDate>#7/1/2012#)
and quoteDrivers.DriverAddedDate >#1/1/2012# ''Added this
GROUP BY quote.CreatedDate, quote.QuoteNumber
ORDER BY quote.CreatedDate;

I get the expected results (minus the quotes with 0 drivers)

CreatedDate         QuoteNumber NumberOfLicensedDrivers
7/1/2012 6:35:39 PM 48650           2
7/2/2012 8:44:34 AM 48670           1

Can anyone explain why I'm not getting the count of drivers without specifying a column in the where clause from the quoteDrivers table?

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In the quotedDrivers linked table, does CreatedDate show as a DateTime field in Access Design View? –  ron tornambe Dec 11 '12 at 21:02
    
@rontornambe, yes both quoteDrivers.DriverAddedDate and quote.CreatedDate are DateTime fields in design view. They however are not the same date and cannot be used as part of the join. –  james31rock Dec 11 '12 at 21:16
    
If the linked tables are in SQL Server, can you run SQL Profiler to see what Jet is doing? –  Laurence Dec 11 '12 at 22:07
    
Thanks Laurence, I am going to have to look how to use SQL Profiler; I have never used it before. –  james31rock Dec 12 '12 at 14:17
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4 Answers

Not sure whether Access supports this, but in general SQL, moving the criteria to the on clause in join will keep the "outer" part of the query working

Select
  quote.CreatedDate, 
  quote.QuoteNumber, 
  count(quoteDrivers.DriversLicense) As NumberOfLicensedDrivers
From
  quote 
    Left Join
  quoteDrivers 
    On quote.ID = quoteDrivers.QuoteID And quoteDrivers.DriverAddedDate > #1/1/2012#
Where
  quote.CreatedDate > #7/1/2012#
Group By
  quote.CreatedDate, 
  quote.QuoteNumber
Order By
  quote.CreatedDate;

Also, your distinct is superfluous with this group by. Probably the optimizer is smart enough to not be any slower, but why take the chance!

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I don't believe Access permits adding conditionals (like quoteDrivers.DriverAddedDate > #1/1/2012#) to the Join's ON clause. –  ron tornambe Dec 11 '12 at 21:08
    
Thanks @Laurence, but I am trying to stay away from adding 'And quoteDrivers.DriverAddedDate > #1/1/2012#' completely. I tried your query and it gave me the same results as the query I have listed under "Here is the query I use for MS ACCESS" –  james31rock Dec 11 '12 at 21:09
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One certain fix: you can create a view on the sql server that encapsulates the join server-side, then link to the view as a linked table in Access. Also check that date variable logic, try replacing it with the DateDiff function to avoid problems with the hardcoded date literal being interpreted differently according to local settings

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Thanks @Chris. I would, but I can't. I wanted to originally create a view and just link to that view. In order to create the query in sql server I had to add a linked server (the query I gave is much more simplified). We have numerous environments with the database for dev, qa and production. We have a VS 2010 DB project that gets deployed to these different environments. In order to create a view I would have to conditionally add a linked server to dev, qa or prod depending on what env I am deploying to. I would also have to change the view select statement depending on the deploy env. –  james31rock Dec 11 '12 at 21:14
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I'd suggest re-writing the query as follows:

SELECT CreatedDate, QuoteNumber, Count(*) as NumberOfLicensedDrivers
FROM (
    SELECT q.CreatedDate, q.QuoteNumber, qd.DriversLicense
    FROM quote q INNER JOIN quoteDrivers qd ON q.ID = qd.QuoteID
    WHERE q.CreatedDate > #7/1/2012#
) X
GROUP BY CreatedDate, QuoteNumber
ORDER BY 1

By combining the tables in the subquery then getting the count of drivers from this, the query form fits into the ruleset of both MS SQL server SQL, and MS Jet SQL (MS access SQL), and accordingly there is less scope for ms access to do "something wrong", whereby the result sets should be the same.

I'm only really uncertain about the dateformat #..#; In SQL this would typically be '..'; If the backend were another ms access db, the format #..# would be mandatory, but given it's sql, '..' may work better - though I can't say for certain offhand, so you may like to test this.

Hope this helps :-)

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Thanks, but that query gives me only quotes that have quote drivers. If I do a LEFT JOIN with the same query it will give me 1 for NumerOfLicensedDrivers even though the number of licensed drivers is 0. Also the query has the same downfall as under the title "Here is the query I use for MS ACCESS". The only way the join works is if I add a WHERE clause against the quoteDrivers table. –  james31rock Dec 12 '12 at 13:54
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

My stupidity caught me. I'm not sure why the following query ever worked.

SELECT DISTINCT 
    quote.CreatedDate, 
    quote.QuoteNumber, 
    count(quoteDrivers.DriversLicense) As NumberOfLicensedDrivers
FROM quote 
LEFT JOIN quoteDrivers ON quote.ID = quoteDrivers.QuoteID
WHERE (quote.CreatedDate>#7/1/2012#)
and quoteDrivers.DriverAddedDate >#1/1/2012# 
GROUP BY quote.CreatedDate, quote.QuoteNumber
ORDER BY quote.CreatedDate;

The quoteDrivers.QuoteID is a string, the quote.ID is a GUID. When creating a linked table MS access adds brackets { } around GUIDS. I'm not sure why the query only worked when I added a where clause against the quoteDrivers table.

The following query gives me exactly what I need.

SELECT DISTINCT 
    quote.CreatedDate, 
    quote.QuoteNumber, 
    count(quoteDrivers.DriversLicense) As NumberOfLicensedDrivers
FROM quote 
LEFT JOIN quoteDrivers ON quote.ID = "{" + quoteDrivers.QuoteID + "}"
WHERE (quote.CreatedDate>#7/1/2012#)
GROUP BY quote.CreatedDate, quote.QuoteNumber
ORDER BY quote.CreatedDate;

I should have explained the column structure before hand, so sorry for not doing that. If someone could explain why my join works when I added a where clause against the quoteDrivers table ("and quoteDrivers.DriverAddedDate >#1/1/2012#") I would really appreciate it.

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