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I currently have one class with 4 methods. I need to change that to AsyncTask. Every method receives different parameters (File, int, String ...) to work with and connects to different URL with post or get. My question is can I still somehow have all those operations in one AsyncTask class or I will need to create new AsyncTask class for every method?

private class Task extends AsyncTask<URL, Integer, Long> {
protected Long doInBackground(URL... urls) {
     int count = urls.length;
     long totalSize = 0;
     for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
     }
     return totalSize;
 }

 protected void onProgressUpdate(Integer... progress) {
     setProgressPercent(progress[0]);
 }

 protected void onPostExecute(Long result) {
     showDialog("Downloaded " + result + " bytes");
 }
 }
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2  
Let's start with a more basic question. Why do you want to convert one class with 4 methods to an AsyncTask, and how do those 4 methods work together? –  PearsonArtPhoto Dec 11 '12 at 21:00
    
I have a class Connector with methods method1(String, String), method2(int, List) etc. When I want to check some data with two strings I call Connector.method1(string1, string2), make new DefaultHttpClient(); and it connects to the specific URL and returns some data. When I want to do the same but with int and List I call Connector.method2(int1, List1), it connects to different URL and it returns some data. And that continues with rest of the methods. I need to switch that to AsyncTask because Android doesn't like when connection is made like that in main thread. –  Cristiano Dec 11 '12 at 21:08
    
Hmmm. Could you post these 4 methods? –  PearsonArtPhoto Dec 11 '12 at 21:10
    
It sounds like he has 4 methods which work correctly, but he realizes that they should be done asynchronously so that they are not in the main thread. –  jamis0n Dec 11 '12 at 21:11
    
Yes, they work correctly. Normal HTTP request/response but the problem is they need to work as a AsyncTask because of new Android limitations. I will post code a little bit later, I'm not currently on that PC. –  Cristiano Dec 11 '12 at 21:19
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This depends if you need all 4 AsyncTasks to run simultaneously or if they can run sequentially.

I would imagine they can run sequentially since that's how they are running currently in the Main thread, so just pass all the needed parameters and execute their operations one by one. In fact, if the functions are already written, just move those functions into your AsyncTask class:

MainActivity.java:

public static final int FILE_TYPE = 0;
public static final int INT_TYPE = 1;
public static final int STRING_TYPE = 2;

taskargs = new Object[] { "mystring", new File("somefile.txt"), new myObject("somearg") };

new Task(STRING_TYPE, taskargs).execute();

AsyncTask

private class Task extends AsyncTask<URL, Integer, Long> {
    private Int type;
    private Object[] objects;
    public Task(Int type, Object[] objects) {
        this.type = type;
        this.objects = objects;
    }
    protected Long doInBackground(URL... urls) {
        int count = urls.length;
        long totalSize = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
        }
        //obviously you can switch on whatever string/int you'd like
        switch (type) {
            case 0:  taskFile();
                     break;
            case 1:  taskInteger();
                     break;
            case 2:  taskString();
                     break;
            default: break;
        }
        return totalSize;
    }

    protected void onProgressUpdate(Integer... progress) {
        setProgressPercent(progress[0]);
    }

    protected void onPostExecute(Long result) {
        showDialog("Downloaded " + result + " bytes");
    }
    protected void taskFile(){ //do something with objects array }
    protected void taskInteger(){ //do something with objects array }
    protected void taskString(){ //do something with objects array }
}
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Hm, not exactly what I was thinking. Method are called when needed. For example, when I'm on the first screen and user clicks button method1 makes connection and returns result, when I'm on some other screen, method2 makes connection to different URL with different parameters and returns result. So, on every screen different sort of method is called. So it doesn't have to be in order. User can call method1, method2, method1, method2, method3 ... –  Cristiano Dec 11 '12 at 21:15
    
Ahh, ok. I understand. In that case, I would recommend using 4 different AsyncTask classes to keep your code clean. However, you could technically make it work by checking which type of task you want to execute. Let me update my code above. –  jamis0n Dec 11 '12 at 21:16
    
So I added a constructor to your AsyncTask class so you can pass as many variables as you want to it along with a type integer. In the example above, I used 0 for your file task, 1 for your int task, and 2 for your string task. Then these variables are captured in the class constructor and you can use them anywhere in your Task class. –  jamis0n Dec 11 '12 at 21:29
    
Yes, I think that's it! I think constructor will look a little bit weird for all the data of all 4 methods because some of them have 2-3 parameters. So it will look something like this: new Task(type, file, int, string, List, long, int, List, long, long, string).execute(); And if I will have more methods in the future it will be very large constructor. Maybe I can add 4 different constructors to avoid that? What do you think? Is there maybe some better solution for massive constructors? –  Cristiano Dec 11 '12 at 22:01
    
I just made it simpler by passing only 1 array of Objects. Based on the TYPE you pass with it, use the Object array accordingly. Note that this is not recommended because each Object could be of any Object type, meaning you will get casting errors if you aren't careful in knowing what the array holds. Only use this if your types are really going to be all over the place :) –  jamis0n Dec 11 '12 at 22:24
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