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I am having trouble with an hw problem in my CS class. The problem has to do with creating a class in python. Heres the prompt

Your class should be named Student, and you should define the following methods:

__init__: This method initializes a Student object.

Parameters: a name, a GPA, and a number of units taken

• Should initialize instance variables for name, GPA, and units based on the information that was passed in. If the GPA or number of units is negative, sets it to 0. (Donʼt worry about non-numeric values in this method.)

update: This method updates the instance variables of the Student object if the Student takes a new class.

• Parameters: units for the new class, grade points earned (as a number) in the new class.

• Should modify the instance variable for units to add the units for the new class

• Should modify the GPA to incorporate the grade earned in the new class. (Note that this will be a weighted average using both the unit counts and both sets of GPAs.)

get_gpa: This method should return the studentʼs GPA.

get_name: This method should return the studentʼs name.

Heres what i have

class Student:
  def__init__(self,name,GPA,units):
    if units <0:
      units=0
    if GPA<0:
      GPA=0
    self.name=name
    self.GPA=GPA
    self.units=units

  def update(newunits,GPE):

thats all i can come up with

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closed as not a real question by Andy Hayden, ekhumoro, pickles, 0x499602D2, Bryan Crosby Dec 12 '12 at 1:26

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Have you learned about lists? I would keep the units and the associated points in lists. Then when you want to calculate the GPA, you can just sum the product of the units and the corresponding points dividing by the total number of units. Of course, get_name should be a pretty easy method to write as well ;-) –  mgilson Dec 11 '12 at 21:25
    
It looks like you are learning about the idea of getters and setters in objects... it would be a good place to start by googling that. –  EEP Dec 11 '12 at 21:26
1  
It would be a good thing reading a basic Python tutorial instead of guessing... –  Andreas Jung Dec 11 '12 at 21:42

2 Answers 2

Let’s go through some points which will hopefully help you:

Constructor (__init__)

If the GPA or number of units is negative, sets it to 0.

So you probably want to check each separately:

if units < 0:
    units = 0
if GPA < 0:
    GPA = 0

Update method

Methods in general take a reference to the current object as the first argument, named self per convention (just as in __init__). So your update method declaration should look like this:

def update(self, newunits, GPE):
    ...

Should modify the instance variable for units to add the units for the new class

Just as you did in the constructor, you can access instance variables using self.varname. So you probably want to do something like this:

self.units += newunits

Should modify the GPA to incorporate the grade earned in the new class. (Note that this will be a weighted average using both the unit counts and both sets of GPAs.)

Just as you update self.units you have to update self.GPA here. Unfortunately, I have no idea what a GPA is and how it is calculated, so I can only guess:

self.GPA = ((self.GPA * oldunits) + (GPE * newunits)) / self.units

Note that I introduced a new local variable oldunits here that simply stores the units temporarily from before it was updated (so oldunits = self.units - newunits after updating).

get_gpa and get_name

These are simple getters that just return a value from the object. Here you have an example for the units, i.e. you should figure it out for the actual wanted values yourself:

def get_units (self):
    return self.units

Note that it’s rather unpythonic to have getters (get_x methods), as you would just expect people to access the properties directly (while handling them with care).

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Thank you, that makes sense, I guess what i was having trouble with is that i wasnt sure if could reference self.units and self.GPA from init in the update method without returning anything in init. Also is my init correct? –  user1786698 Dec 11 '12 at 21:38
    
Yeah, your init looks fine to me. If it helps understanding how the init works; when a new object is created, Python will first create the object and then call the __init__ method internally to, well, initialize it. At that point, the object already exists and no return value is expected. –  poke Dec 11 '12 at 22:06

I'll help you to complete the question, but let me point out a little mistake first:

if units <0 and GPA <0:
  units=0
  GPA=0

This will set units and GPA to zero only if they are both negative. You'll want to set each to zero if it's negative, even if the other is not. Change it to:

if units < 0: units = 0
if GPA < 0: GPA = 0

Concerning your update method, the correct signature would be:

def update(self, newunits, GPE):

Python object methods should always start with self.

Now, I'm not sure about how to calculate the GPA (we use a different system were I live), but according to some quite google queries, your update method should be something like:

def update(self, newunits, GPE):
    GPE_earned_before = self.GPA * self.units
    total_GPE = GPE_earned_before + GPE
    self.GPA = total_GPE / (self.units + newunits)
    self.units += newunits

I used a lot of variables here, to make things clear, but this can be shortened to:

def update(self, newunits, GPE):
    self.GPA = (self.GPA * self.units + GPE) / (self.units + newunits)
    self.units += newunits
share|improve this answer
    
Wow just noticed that could i also use or instead of the and? –  user1786698 Dec 11 '12 at 21:26
    
Never mind just realized that or would set both to 0 even if just one was negative –  user1786698 Dec 11 '12 at 21:29

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