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Can someone show me the proper format to use for hashing and salting in a PDO prepared statement? I'm switching from php and trying to get this to work in a simple INSERT statement before worrying about the more complex functions, and nothing that I've seen online has worked.

In php I was doing this: '".sha1($salt + $_POST['password'])."'

I've tried:

$password = '123456'; 
$hash = hash('sha1', $password);
$pass1 = hash('sha1', $salt . $hash . $password);

$salt is defined in config.php, referenced correctly, and works properly in php insert statements.

EDIT -

This is the INSERT statement that I'm using:

$stmt = $conn->prepare('INSERT INTO customer_info (fname...) VALUES(:fname...)');
$stmt->bindParam(':fname', $_POST['fname'], PDO::PARAM_STR);
$stmt->execute();   
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1  
sha1 is not really a good way to hash passwords. A better solution would be to use bcrypt. Not only is sha1 somewhat broken, but it is also a fast algorithm which is pretty bad for hashing passwords for obvious reasons. –  PeeHaa Dec 11 '12 at 21:53
    
@PeeHaa: Thanks for the info :-) I'll look into switching to bcrypt, but I'd prefer getting this to work first (I find that it's easier to debug if I only switch one thing at a time). Any suggestions on the proper format to use for hashing and salting on a basic INSERT statement? –  Chaya Cooper Dec 12 '12 at 0:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Most database systems do not have decent passwort hash functions available, so you cannot generate the hash value with SQL. I'm not sure what you mean with "switching from PHP", but let the development language generate the hash, not the database system.

The salt should be different for every password, a global salt cannot fulfill it's purpose. Your "salt" is actually a key (or pepper), it is always the same. A salt has to be stored (plaintext) together with the hash-value, you need it to compare the stored hash with the hash of the entered password.

PHP 5.5 will have it's own functions password_hash() and password_verify() ready, to simplify generating BCrypt password hashes. I strongly recommend to use this excellent api, or it's compatibility pack for earlier PHP versions. Then i would invite you to read more about correct password storing with salt and pepper in this tutorial.

Edit:

Normally an insert with PDO looks something like this:

$password = $_POST['password'];
$hashedPassword = sha1($password . $salt);
$sql = 'INSERT INTO user (name, passwordhash) VALUES (?, ?)';
$sth = $pdo->prepare($sql);
$sth->execute(array('Jack Cornfield', $hashedPassword));

Of course your statement will look different, but i don't know your table and fields. In the example, the generation of the hash is done in pure PHP, and the resulting $hash is added parameterized to the sql statement with placeholders.

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So I just use that 1 row and reference it as $hash in my values? I know that sha1 isn't the best way to go, and I'll probably switch to a better hashing method after this, but I first want to get things working with PDO prepared statements (I find that it's easier to debug when I only change one thing at a time ;-)) –  Chaya Cooper Dec 12 '12 at 16:07
    
I don't quite understand what you were explaining about the way the strings are concatenated differently in PHP and SQL. I tried removing some/all of the quotes and . and even tried removing '$salt +', but that didn't help. I'm currently using a static value for salt (it's stored in another folder which is secure). The original statement sanitized the password first, and then I added sha1 and salt in the INSERT function with the code above. –  Chaya Cooper Dec 12 '12 at 16:12
    
You were generous enough to take the time to ask me about other aspects of my code, so I wanted to explain/clarify some of that to :-) I'm currently using a static value for salt (it's stored in another folder which is secure). In the original code the password value was sanitized, and then sha1 and salt were added in the INSERT function (with the code above). I don't quite understand what you were explaining about the way the strings are concatenated differently in PHP and SQL. I'd tried removing some/all of the '". and even removed salt entirely, but none of that helped. –  Chaya Cooper Dec 12 '12 at 16:19
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@ChayaCooper - With named placeholders your insert statement would look something like this: $sql = 'INSERT INTO user (name, passwordhash) VALUES (:username, :password)';. Then you can call the bindParam as you suggested. –  martinstoeckli Dec 12 '12 at 17:08
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@ChayaCooper - I think you got it right. The only thing that must match is the name in VALUES :fname and the name in bindParam ':fname'. The fieldname of the database is defined in INSERT INTO customer_info (fname...) and can be different, the variable from the HTML form you get with $_POST['fname'], it can be different too. I don't remember what the first way was to create $hashedPassword sorry..., but it should be done with the mentioned library anyway password_hash($password, PASSWORD_BCRYPT), the salt will be created automatically. –  martinstoeckli Dec 12 '12 at 18:44

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