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How to deduce the type of the functor’s return value?

Given the following examples:

<type>& operator+(const <type>& rhs) {
   // *this.data + rhs
}

How do I return the value of the summation in an object of type < type>?

If I code:

<type>& operator+(const <type>& rhs) {
   <type> cell;
   switch(rhs.type {
   case DOUBLE:
   {
     cell.data = (double)cell.data + (double)rhs.data;  
   }
   return cell;
}

I return a temporary stack value, and receive an error message.

If I code:

<type>& operator+(const <type>& rhs) {
  *this.data = *this.field + rhs.data;
  return *this;
}

I overwrite this which is not the intent of the addition.

This is just an example. The 'real' code requires that I be able to add (subtract, ...) any number of input data types, which in it's turn requires that the return value is able to accommodate any on of several types, which it can and does.

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marked as duplicate by Bo Persson, ildjarn, WhozCraig, ArtemStorozhuk, Mario Dec 12 '12 at 21:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers 2

operator+ should return by value, not by reference. Since the operator should not be modifying either the left or right sides you need a third object to modify. You have to create that one inside the function. And since you can't return a reference to a local variable the best thing to do is to return by value.

<type> operator+(const <type> &rhs) {
  <type> sum = *this;
  sum.data = sum.data + rhs.data;
  return sum;
}

Instead it's operator+= which should return by reference, because += is supposed to modify the left side anyway.

<type> &operator+= (const <type> &rhs) {
    this->data += rhs.data;
    return *this;
}

And then you can implement + in terms of +=.

<type> operator+(const <type> &rhs) {
  <type> sum = *this;
  return sum += rhs;
}

Also, usually operator+ will be implemented as a non-member function so that conversions on both the right and left sides will work normally. With the member function conversion on the left side aren't considered the same.

<type> operator+(<type> lhs, const <type> &rhs) {
    return lhs += rhs;
}

Plus this way you can take the left side by value and maybe take advantage of copy/move-elision.

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The simplest and probably best way is to change the return type from <type>& to <type>.

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