Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a task which consumes arbit CPU and memory over time. It gives me an output executing the following linux command:

mpstat -u 1 -P ALL

The output looks like:

02:22:14 PM  CPU    %usr   %nice    %sys %iowait    %irq   %soft  %steal  %guest   %idle
02:22:15 PM  all    4.51    0.00    0.11    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00   95.37
02:22:15 PM    0    0.00    0.00    1.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00   99.00
02:22:15 PM    1   **78.22**    0.00    0.99    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00   20.79

02:22:15 PM    2    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00  100.00
02:22:15 PM    3    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00  100.00
02:22:15 PM    4    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
02:22:15 PM    5    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
02:22:15 PM    6    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00  100.00
02:22:15 PM    7    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
02:22:15 PM    8    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
02:22:15 PM    9    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
02:22:15 PM   10    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
02:22:15 PM   11    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
02:22:15 PM   12    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
02:22:15 PM   13    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
02:22:15 PM   14    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
02:22:15 PM   15    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00  100.00
02:22:15 PM   16    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
02:22:15 PM   17    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
02:22:15 PM   18    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
02:22:15 PM   19    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00  100.00
02:22:15 PM   20    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
02:22:15 PM   21    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
02:22:15 PM   22    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00
02:22:15 PM   23    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00

I want to grab the value located in 4th column and 3rd row a[3][4] i.e 78.22 every 20 seconds in bash/python/perl. So the script I want, will execute the mpstat command and print out the value in the specified column and based on the values it creates a graph. I was thinking of appending the required value in a .dat file and run a gnuplot or and app which creates the graph.

Any suggestion on how to go?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can get the 3rd row and 4th cell using awk. The following code grabs this cell from mpstat's output and appends it along with the current UNIX timestamp to a statistics file.

mpstat -u 1 -P ALL | awk 'NR==4 {print systime(), $4}' >> stats.txt

To run this command every 20 seconds:

watch -n 20 "mpstat -u 1 -P ALL | awk 'NR==4 {print systime(), \$4}' >> stats.txt"

Then plot with gnuplot:

cat stats.txt | gnuplot -p -e 'set datafile separator " "; plot "-" using 1:2 with lines'
share|improve this answer
    
On doing this:mpstat -u 1 -P ALL | awk 'NR==4 {print systime(), $4}' >> stats.txt, stats.txt ends out to be an empty file. –  learning Dec 12 '12 at 4:14
    
Also what I see is that it doesn't print out the values in continuity rather prints it once and stops. My objective is to continually keep a tab on CPU usage till the process runs hence this won't suffice but some improvements to it will be awesome. –  learning Dec 12 '12 at 5:51
    
You can repeat the command with a while loop or (my favorite) watch. Updated the original answer. –  Jon Gauthier Dec 12 '12 at 14:15
    
Are you still seeing an empty file? (I'm not sure after your second comment.) –  Jon Gauthier Dec 12 '12 at 14:20
add comment

Try the following

#!/bin/bash
function _mpstat() {
    while :; do
        arr=( $(mpstat -P 1 | tail -n 1) )
        echo "${arr[3]}"
        sleep 20
    done >> file.txt
}
_mpstat &
echo "_mpstat PID: $!"

Explanation

  • while :; do Infinite loop
  • $(mpstat -P 1 | tail -n 1) Mpstat only cpu 1 -P 1and tail -n 1 the last line, return value $()
  • arr=( ... ) Commands return value to array
  • echo "${arr[3]}" echo array index 3
  • sleep 20 Sleep for 20 seconds
  • >> file.txt Send stdout to file within while loop block.
  • _mpstat & Send the function to a background process &
  • echo "_mpstat PID: $! Returns PID of function

You can grep the PID to display its parent and kill both when needed.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.