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I am integrating core data into my application, I already have a sqllite DB file. Should I create a new one to make it easier, or should I use the existing one. I am sorry for the many questions, thank you in advanced!!

Also, how do I create a new one?

I implemented the methods below into appdelegate (no errors), however I don't know what to put in the text fields

What is this? Is "myCoreData" the name of the core data db created with a .xcdatamodeld ending? If so, what is momd?

NSURL *modelURL = [[NSBundle mainBundle] URLForResource:@"myCoreData" withExtension:@"momd"];

what is this? Does this create the database, or should I create it and put the info here? Where is this stored?

NSURL *storeURL = [[self applicationDocumentsDirectoryModified] URLByAppendingPathComponent:@"coreDataDB.sqlite"];

this is the implementation

- (void)saveContext
{
    NSError *error = nil;
    NSManagedObjectContext *managedObjectContext = self.managedObjectContext;
    if (managedObjectContext != nil) {
        if ([managedObjectContext hasChanges] && ![managedObjectContext save:&error]) {
            // Replace this implementation with code to handle the error appropriately.
            // abort() causes the application to generate a crash log and terminate. You should not use this function in a shipping application, although it may be useful during development.
            NSLog(@"Unresolved error %@, %@", error, [error userInfo]);
            abort();
        }
    }
}

#pragma Core Data stack

// Returns the managed object context for the application.
// If the context doesn't already exist, it is created and bound to the persistent store coordinator for the application.
- (NSManagedObjectContext *)managedObjectContext
{
    if (_managedObjectContext != nil) {
        return _managedObjectContext;
    }

    NSPersistentStoreCoordinator *coordinator = [self persistentStoreCoordinator];
    if (coordinator != nil) {
        _managedObjectContext = [[NSManagedObjectContext alloc] init];
        [_managedObjectContext setPersistentStoreCoordinator:coordinator];
    }
    return _managedObjectContext;
}

// Returns the managed object model for the application.
// If the model doesn't already exist, it is created from the application's model.
- (NSManagedObjectModel *)managedObjectModel
{
    if (_managedObjectModel != nil) {
        return _managedObjectModel;
    }
    NSURL *modelURL = [[NSBundle mainBundle] URLForResource:@"myCoreData" withExtension:@"momd"];
    _managedObjectModel = [[NSManagedObjectModel alloc] initWithContentsOfURL:modelURL];
    return _managedObjectModel;
}

// Returns the persistent store coordinator for the application.
// If the coordinator doesn't already exist, it is created and the application's store added to it.
- (NSPersistentStoreCoordinator *)persistentStoreCoordinator
{
    if (_persistentStoreCoordinator != nil) {
        return _persistentStoreCoordinator;
    }

    NSURL *storeURL = [[self applicationDocumentsDirectoryModified] URLByAppendingPathComponent:@"coreDataDB.sqlite"];

    NSError *error = nil;
    _persistentStoreCoordinator = [[NSPersistentStoreCoordinator alloc] initWithManagedObjectModel:[self managedObjectModel]];
    if (![_persistentStoreCoordinator addPersistentStoreWithType:NSSQLiteStoreType configuration:nil URL:storeURL options:nil error:&error]) {

        NSLog(@"Unresolved error %@, %@", error, [error userInfo]);
        abort();
    }

    return _persistentStoreCoordinator;
}
share|improve this question
    
Just use Magical Record. It's awesome and takes care of the boiler plate code for you. Here's an example: yannickloriot.com/2012/03/… – mkral Dec 11 '12 at 23:18
    
looks interesting, but I want to learn this core data stuff before using this – William Falcon Dec 11 '12 at 23:21
    
If you're just getting your feet wet then sure. But if you're using threading in a production app I would strongly recommend MR. It makes your life much simpiler – mkral Dec 11 '12 at 23:32
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Did not use Magical record, Ended up adding the boilerplate code from a new project in xcode. Start a simgle view application, click coredata, go to adddelegate, at the bottom are most the methods you need.

To make it easier, I created a communicator with all the methods that I needed for coredata.

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