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I don't understand this code from the clojure 1.5 release notes. It uses the cond-> macro. For example, how would it translate into pre-1.5 code?

user=> (cond-> 1
               true inc
               false (* 42)
               (= 2 2) (* 3))
6
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where did you find that? –  mishadoff Dec 11 '12 at 23:34
    
At a guess I would imagine this gives 6 = (* 3 (inc 1)), where it threads the first argument through any functions whose predicate evaluates to true. –  cobbal Dec 11 '12 at 23:35
1  

1 Answer 1

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Each step changes the result if the test is true, or leaves it alone if the test is false.

You could write this in 1.4 by threading anonymous functions:

user> (-> 1 (#(if true (inc %) %)) 
            (#(if false (* % 42) %)) 
            (#(if (= 2 2) (* % 3) %)))
6

Though the cond-> does not introduce new functions, instead it generates a binding form to be more efficient:

user> (let [g 1 
            g (if true (inc g) g) 
            g (if false (* g 42) g) 
            g (if (= 2 2) (* g 3) g)] 
      g)
6

and uses a gensym for g incase some of the forms use the symbol g


cond->> is very similar, it just places the threaded symbol in a diferent place.

user> (let [g 1 
            g (if true (inc g) g) 
            g (if false (* 42 g) g) 
            g (if (= 2 2) (* 3 g) g)] 
       g)
6

which in this example gives the same result because * and + are commutative.

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I like the middle example very... very much. That made it a lot more clear. –  Zchpyvr Dec 12 '12 at 1:14
    
Also, I'm assuming that the cond->> macro does a similiar routine? –  Zchpyvr Dec 12 '12 at 1:15
    
sorry, I was editing it while you commented, which was the middle? –  Arthur Ulfeldt Dec 12 '12 at 1:15
    
It was the second one :) –  Zchpyvr Dec 12 '12 at 1:15
    
editing to include cond->> –  Arthur Ulfeldt Dec 12 '12 at 1:16

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