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Need to create a script to check to see if the kernel is in PAE mode or not. Surely, it is not enough to just check if the /proc/cpuinfo flags have this 'pae' setting.

We must know if the PAE mechanism has actually been not only implemented, but activated as well.

Because the PAE kernel is now the new default, and that if you need a non-PAE kernel, one has to make another kernel nowadays.

  1. In other word, how do we tell if a kernel is non-PAE on a CPU having PAE (is one of two possible conditions to test for).

  2. Other is, how to tell if a kernel is PAE on a CPU having no PAE-support.

And there's no way to tell if CONFIG_HIGHMEM or CONFIG_PAE kernel configuration option was used in a typical secured kernel.

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/proc/cpuinfo is a reliable way to determine if a given processor runs in PAE mode. This being not enough for you seems to imply you want to test a BIOS setting through your Linux platform. Can you elaborate on what exactly you want to achieve? –  Frédéric Hamidi Dec 12 '12 at 0:21
    
Because the PAE kernel is now the default, and that if you need a non-PAE kernel, one has to make it nowaday. In other word, how do I tell if a kernel is non-PAE on a CPU having PAE (is one of two possible conditions to test for). Other is, how to tell if a kernel is PAE on a CPU having no PAE-support. And there's no way to tell if CONFIG_HIGHMEM or CONFIG_PAE was used in a secured kernel setup. –  John Greene Dec 12 '12 at 0:36
    
updated question to reflect this. –  John Greene Dec 12 '12 at 0:43

2 Answers 2

Usually, CONFIG_PAE can be discovered in your /boot/config-*, like this:

$ cat /boot/config-$(uname -r) | grep PAE
  CONFIG_X86_PAE=y

Do you not have access to the that file?

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One way is to read the CR4 register and look at bit 5. It will be 1 for PAE and 0 for no PAE. You can read that register in some code running in the kernel (e.g. a kernel driver). You may be able to write a tiny driver for this purpose. It shouldn't be very complicated.

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