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I want to compare two big files with different column and row numbers and print those line which have a common word (like KJ):

file1:

XT1 123 aa NR
XT2 444 bb GF 
XT3 666 aa KJ

file2

fc KK pcn
wd CC KJ

output

XT3 666 aa wd CC KJ

I tried but I didn't get anything:

awk 'FNR==NR{a[$4]=$3;next}{if (a[$3])print a[$3],$0}' file1 file2

Thank you in advance for your help

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1  
Your question is unclear. Are you asking to match up all pairs of lines that share any common word, regardless of where in the file they occur? If file was as shown, but file2 had 100,000 lines of other data prior to the two lines you show, would you still want that match to appear? –  Jim Garrison Dec 12 '12 at 0:54
1  
What if a line from file1 matched more than one line from file2, or vice-versa. What if the matches were on different fields? –  Jim Garrison Dec 12 '12 at 0:55
    
I want to print only those pairs of lines that share any common word in $4 (file1) and $3(file2). –  EpiMan Dec 12 '12 at 1:00
    
names in $3 and $4 are uniqe –  EpiMan Dec 12 '12 at 1:00
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Based on the limited info you provided,

my $file1 = '...';
my $file2 = '...';

my %file2;
{
   open(my $fh2, '<', $file2)
      or die("Can't open \"$file2\": $!\n');
   while (<$fh2>) {
      my @F = split;
      $file2{$F[2]} = join(' ', @F[0,1]);
   }
}

{
   open(my $fh1, '<', $file1)
      or die("Can't open \"$file1\": $!\n');
   while (<$fh1>) {
      my @F = split;
      print(join(' ', @F[0..2], $file2{$F[3]}, $F[3]), "\n")
         if $file2{$F[3]};
   }
}

I assumed the following:

  • file2 fits in memory as a hash of lines.
  • A keyword doesn't appear twice in file2.
  • You're only interested in matching the 4th column of file1 with the 3rd column of file2.

It maintains the order of the lines as they appear in file1.

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works very nice, thank you very much :) –  EpiMan Dec 12 '12 at 1:20
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You were close, try this:

awk 'FNR==NR { a[$4]=$1 FS $2 FS $3; next } $3 in a { print a[$3], $0 }' file1 file2

Results:

XT3 666 aa wd CC KJ

Quick explanation:

In 'file1', add column 4 to an array with columns 1, 2 and 3 as it's values.

In 'file2', check if column 3 is in the array and if it is, print out it's value and the current line.

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works very nice, thank you so much :) –  EpiMan Dec 12 '12 at 1:20
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I'd create a separate hash of words to lines numbers for each file, and an array storing each line, for each file.

then I'd iterate of the list of words in file 1, and look for a match in file 2. If I find a match, then I'd look up the line numbers for the word in both files. Using the line number, I'd retrieve the "lines" form the arrays, and return the list of unique words.

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