Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm working on a JavaScript library which needs to give the user the ability to run some code on load. Of course, I'm familiar with window.onload, and things like $(function() {}); with jQuery. But I don't want to be dependent on another library, and I want this particular function (along with the rest of the lib, of course) to be cross-browser.

So is there an accepted way of attaching to the onload function without overriding another library's load functionality (or having mine overwritten if they include another lib after mine)?

share|improve this question
    
Yes. "See how jQuery [or framework X] does it". Sadly, this is still not entirely cross-browser (yay for different event models!). In any case, this is a "solved problem" and source, including work-abouts, is readily available. –  user166390 Dec 12 '12 at 1:35
2  
A common strategy is to put onload scripts in a script element just before the closing body tag. No need for window.onload or DOMReady or whatever. Works everywhere. –  RobG Dec 12 '12 at 1:35
    
@RobG "Usually works". Sometimes the point of handling an event [later] than inline script elements is because of dependencies [but not the kind in the title] on other component .. –  user166390 Dec 12 '12 at 1:39
    
@pst, I was hoping to avoid traipsing through a huge codebase such as jQuery. If it's a "solved problem", then surely someone has written about it somewhere? –  Joel Martinez Dec 12 '12 at 1:40
2  
Expose an initialization/onload method and require it be called by the consumer on load. In other words, push the issue off to whomever is using the library and will likely have a convenient method like that offered by jQuery. It is a solved problem but it isn't simple: javascript onload without jQuery (the first hit has the source pulled from a version of jQuery). –  Cymen Dec 12 '12 at 1:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Expose an initialization/onload method and require it be called by the consumer on load. In other words, push the issue off to whomever is using the library and will likely have a convenient method like that offered by jQuery.

This is a solved problem but it isn't simple: the answer to "$(document).ready equivalent without jQuery" has the code of how jQuery does this.

More hits: javascript onload without jQuery

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, yeah it was the one you mentioned (stackoverflow.com/a/800010/5416) with the details of how jQuery does it. –  Joel Martinez Dec 12 '12 at 2:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.