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int main()
{    
    string a;

    a[0] = '1';
    a[1] = '2';
    a[2] = '\0';

    cout << a;
}

Why doesn't this code work? Why is it not printing the string?

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3  
a is empty. Therefore, undefined behaviour for writing to anything past what capacity() returns. –  chris Dec 12 '12 at 2:31
    
A string uses a character array under the hood. But as chris said, it's currently empty, this what you're doing is undefined. It would be much easier to do string a = "12"; –  Borgleader Dec 12 '12 at 2:33
3  
There's actually no guarantee that std::string simply uses a char array under the hood is there? The only guarantee is that std::strng.c_str() will return one. –  Troy Dec 12 '12 at 2:35
    
@Troy, It has to have a char *, doesn't it? I think that also has to be null-terminated as of C++11. –  chris Dec 12 '12 at 2:36
    
That's possible but to my knowledge at least some of them do. I guess I should have been more careful with my wording. –  Borgleader Dec 12 '12 at 2:36

5 Answers 5

Because a is empty. You get the same problem if you try to do that same thing with an empty array. You need to give it some size:

a.resize(5); // Now a is 5 chars long, and you can set them however you want

Alternatively, you can set the size when you instantiate a:

std::string a(5, ' '); // Now there are 5 spaces, and you can use operator[] to overwrite them
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First, I think you mean std::string.

Second, Your string is empty.

Third, while you can use the operator[] to change an element in a string, you cannot use it to insert an element where none exists:

std::string a = "12";
a[0] = '3'; //a is now "32"
a[2] = '4'; //doesn't work

In order to do so, you need to make sure your string has allocated enough memory first. Therfore,

std::string a = "12";
a[0] = '3'; //a is now "32"
a.resize(3); //a is still "32"
a[2] = '4'; //a is now "324"

Fourth, what you probably want is:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
int main()
{    
    std::string a = "12";    
    std::cout << a;
}
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Using operator[] to add characters to a string is not supported. There are a variety of reasons why this is the case, but one of them is this:

string a;
a[1] = 12;

What should a[0] be?

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This is only if the space isn't already allocated, which is the same for c-strings. Use std::string.resize first and you can add(?) characters all you like. –  Troy Dec 12 '12 at 2:47
1  
@Troy: I think you're using a different definition of add. What you call 'adding', I (and I'm sure David) would call 'changing'. If you resized, the characters were already added. –  Benjamin Lindley Dec 12 '12 at 3:06

In C++, a string is an object, not an array. Try:

string a = "12";
cout << a;

If you like, you can still use old-style C-strings, so:

char a[3];
a[0] = '1';
a[1] = '2';
a[2] = '\0';
...

What you're trying to do is mix these two modes, which is why it doesn't work.

Edit: As others have pointed out, subscripting a std::string object can work, so long as the string has been initialised with sufficient capacity. In the case here, the string is empty and therefore all the subscripts are out of bounds.

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some problems in topcoder aks u to pass some specific values so its needed –  user1896457 Dec 12 '12 at 2:41

Going by the definition for the subscript operator on std::string:

const char& operator[] ( size_t pos ) const;
      char& operator[] ( size_t pos );

Non-const subscripting is possible. So the following should work fine:

std::string a;
a.resize(2);

a[0] = '1';
a[1] = '2';

std::cout << a;

Seems like a round-about way to do it though.

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