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#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    static char* buf;

    buf = (char*)malloc(20*sizeof(char));

    scanf("%s",buf);

    while(buf[0] != NULL)
        printf("\n%s\n",buf++);

    free(buf);
    buf=NULL;

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

Message box during execution free(buf):

Windows has triggered a breakpoint in clean_rough_draft.exe.

This may be due to a corruption of the heap, which indicates a bug in clean_rough_draft.exe or any of the DLLs it has loaded.

This may also be due to the user pressing F12 while clean_rough_draft.exe has focus.

The output window may have more diagnostic information.

What's the reason? I just want to free memory without a leak...

share|improve this question
    
change static char* buf; to char *buf; And while(buf[0] != NULL) to while(buf[0] != 0), try again. –  laifjei Dec 12 '12 at 3:01
    
@laifjei Things that you pointed out doesn't matter. –  0x6B6F77616C74 Dec 12 '12 at 3:15
    
@0x6B6F77616C74: They're not related to the crash, but in terms of "good practice" they're worth pointing out. –  Cornstalks Dec 12 '12 at 3:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Because you're incrementing buf, and then trying to free() it. By the time you free() it, it is no longer pointing to what malloc() returned.

Also (this isn't related to your crash), you probably should be checking buf[0] != '\0' instead of buf[0] != NULL.

share|improve this answer
    
pastebin.com/EJkRjPS1 Is it exactly what you meant? –  0x6B6F77616C74 Dec 12 '12 at 3:12
    
@0x6B6F77616C74: Yes. –  Cornstalks Dec 12 '12 at 3:19
    
I had checked it , but I thought there is a better way to implement this. –  0x6B6F77616C74 Dec 12 '12 at 3:24
    
@0x6B6F77616C74: And what do you mean by "better?" You either have to keep a copy of the pointer, or you have to use an index counter (and not increment buf). Which you choose is entirely up to you. Although I would certainly say using fgets() (with stdin) instead of scanf() is better (because scanf() can lead to overflow errors) –  Cornstalks Dec 12 '12 at 3:33

Problem is "printf("\n%s\n",buf++);" i.e. you are changing the base address returned by the "malloc" i.e. "buf". For "free();" api you have to pass the base address returned by the "malloc" api.

Alternative or Solution would be: Have an extra character pointer and temporarily store the base address returned by "malloc", if dynamic allocation is successful. Re-storing it back while freeing the allocated memory.

 #include<stdio.h>
 #include<stdlib.h>

    int main()
    {
        static char* buf;
        static char *temp;

        buf = (char*)malloc(20*sizeof(char));
        /* Better to check for the allocation failure */
        if(!buf) 
        {
           printf("Failed to allocate memory \n");
           exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        } 
        else
        {
          temp = buf; 

          scanf("%s",buf);

          while(*buf != '\0')
              printf("\n%s\n",buf++);

          /* restoring the base address back to buf */
          buf = temp; 

          free(buf);
          buf=NULL;
          temp = NULL; 
        }

          return 0;
    }
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