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I got an array of consisting of 0 and 1. The 1s form continuous clusters as show in the image.

Clustering

The number of clusters are not known beforehand.

Is there some way to create a list with the positions of all the clusters, or a list for each cluster which contain the position of all its members. For example:

cluster_list = continuous_cluster_finder(data_array)
cluster_list[0] = [(pixel1_x, pixel1_y), (pixel2_x, pixel2_y),...]
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What exactly separates the clusters? Is it safe to say that each cluster of ones is surrounded by zeros? Meaning above,below,left,right are zeros? –  vkontori Dec 12 '12 at 3:20
    
What's the format of data_array? List of lists? numpy array? One of python's arrays? –  Nick ODell Dec 12 '12 at 3:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is not clear from the description what are the exact constraints of the problem. Assuming you can distinguish a cluster by zeros on left, right,above,below then the following solves the problem...

#!/usr/bin/env python

data = [ #top-left
         [0,0,1,1,0,0],
         [0,0,1,1,0,0],
         [1,1,0,0,1,1],
         [1,1,0,0,1,1],
         [0,0,1,1,0,0],
         [0,0,1,1,0,0],
         [1,1,0,0,1,1],
         [1,1,0,0,1,1],
       ]             # bottom-right

d = {} # point --> clid
dcl = {} # clid --> [point1,point2,...]

def process_point(t):
    global clid # cluster id
    val = data[t[0]][t[1]]
    above = (t[0]-1, t[1])
    abovevalid = 0 <= above[0] < maxX and 0 <= above[1] < maxY
    #below = (t[0]+1, t[1]) # We do not need that because we scan from top-left to bottom-right
    left = (t[0], t[1]-1)
    leftvalid = 0 <= left[0] < maxX and 0 <= left[1] < maxY
    #right = (t[0], t[1]+1) # We do not need that because we scan from top-left to bottom-right

    if not val: # for zero return
        return
    if left in d and above in d and d[above] != d[left]:
        # left and above on different clusters, merge them
        prevclid = d[left]
        dcl[d[above]].extend(dcl[prevclid]) # update dcl
        for l in dcl[d[left]]:
            d[l] = d[above] # update d
        del dcl[prevclid]
        dcl[d[above]].append(t)
        d[t] = d[above]
    elif above in d and abovevalid:
        dcl[d[above]].append(t)
        d[t] = d[above]
    elif left in d and leftvalid:
        dcl[d[left]].append(t)
        d[t] = d[left]
    else: # First saw this one 
        dcl[clid] = [t]
        d[t] = clid
        clid += 1

def print_output():
    for k in dcl: # Print output
        print k, dcl[k]

def main():
    global clid
    global maxX
    global maxY
    maxX = len(data)
    maxY = len(data[0])
    clid = 0
    for i in xrange(maxX):
        for j in xrange(maxY):
            process_point((i,j))
    print_output()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

It prints ...

0 [(0, 2), (0, 3), (1, 2), (1, 3)]
1 [(2, 0), (2, 1), (3, 0), (3, 1)]
2 [(2, 4), (2, 5), (3, 4), (3, 5)]
3 [(4, 2), (4, 3), (5, 2), (5, 3)]
4 [(6, 0), (6, 1), (7, 0), (7, 1)]
5 [(6, 4), (6, 5), (7, 4), (7, 5)]
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Nice implementation of connected-components algorithm. A graph coloring approach with a DFS from each unvisited node is bound to be faster, I think. –  Arcturus Feb 23 '13 at 19:02

You can look a well known 'blob' finding algorithms which are used in image processing to isolate regions of same color. You can also brew your own flavors by finding the islands and marking them visited (while all of them are unvisited at start); all connected ( in a 3x3 grid the center pixel as 8 connected-ness ) and visited pixels form one region; you need to find all such regions in the map.

Blob finding is what you need to look for.

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