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I'm trying to persist the following object with spring-data-mongodb version 1.1.1.RELEASE:

@Document
public static class TestObject {

    private final int m_property;

    @PersistenceConstructor
    public TestObject(int a_property) {
        m_property = a_property;
    }

    public int property() {
        return m_property;
    }

}

I get a MappingException when I try to read the object back from the database (see full stacktrace below)

The naming convention my group uses requires argument variable names to be prefaced by a_ and instance variable names to be prefaced by m_. It seems like spring-data-mongodb is making the assumption that the constructor argument variable names must match the object instance variable names.

  • Why doesn't spring-data-mongodb use the constructor argument to instance variable mapping that I define within the constructor?
  • Is there another way to define this mapping such that spring-data-mongodb will properly construct my object, or is my only option to break the naming convention?

.

Exception in thread "main" org.springframework.data.mapping.model.MappingException: No property a_property found on entity class com.recorder.TestRecorder$TestObject to bind constructor parameter to!
    at org.springframework.data.mapping.model.PersistentEntityParameterValueProvider.getParameterValue(PersistentEntityParameterValueProvider.java:90)
    at org.springframework.data.convert.ReflectionEntityInstantiator.createInstance(ReflectionEntityInstantiator.java:70)
    at org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.convert.MappingMongoConverter.read(MappingMongoConverter.java:229)
    at org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.convert.MappingMongoConverter.read(MappingMongoConverter.java:209)
    at org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.convert.MappingMongoConverter.read(MappingMongoConverter.java:173)
    at org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.convert.MappingMongoConverter.read(MappingMongoConverter.java:169)
    at org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.convert.MappingMongoConverter.read(MappingMongoConverter.java:72)
    at org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.MongoTemplate$ReadDbObjectCallback.doWith(MongoTemplate.java:1820)
    at org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.MongoTemplate.executeFindMultiInternal(MongoTemplate.java:1542)
    at org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.MongoTemplate.findAll(MongoTemplate.java:1064)
    at com.recorder.TestRecorder.main(TestRecorder.java:43)
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

tl;dr

We need to rely on constructor argument names to match field names to find out which field of the document to pull in. If you want to customize this use @Value("#root.field_name") on the constructor argument.

Long story

If you're using a constructor with arguments to let Spring Data instantiate the given class using this constructor we have to hand parameters to the constructor upon invocation. To find out which document field we have to hand in, we need to inspect the matching property for potential field name customization. See the following example:

@Document
class MyEntity {

  @Field("foo")
  private String myField;

  public MyEntity(String myField) {
    this.myField = myField;
  }
}

In this case we need to pipe the field foo into the constructor and there's no way to find out about this if we don't somehow can obtain a reference to the property. If the constructor parameter name was something different, how should we reliably find out which field value should actually be used as argument? The example you've shown in your question can never work out of the box, as your document would contain a m_property field and there's absolutely no way to find out you actually want that to be injected, except adding more explicit configuration.

To customize this behavior you can use Spring's @Value annotation and inject a custom document field into the constructor. The document itself is available through the #root variable. So you could easily alter my sample above to:

@Document
class MyEntity {

  @Field("foo")
  private String myField;

  public MyEntity(@Value("#root.foo") String somethingDifferent) {
    this.myField = somethingDifferent;
  }
}

I'd strongly recommend that you add custom field names to your properties as well as you don't want to expose your property naming conventions to the database. The usage pf @Value is briefly mentioned in the reference docs but I've created a ticket to improve the docs and make this more obvious.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the detailed explanation! This is very helpful! –  Ben Baumgold Dec 12 '12 at 19:09
    
One follow-up question for you - if I do what you suggest, it seems to work for objects that only contain primitives, but I get an exception whenever I try to use objects that contain other objects. Do you know what is going on here? I've listed the details in Question 13854753 –  Ben Baumgold Dec 13 '12 at 7:09
    
FYI - I've created DATAMONGO-592 to track the issue of not being able to use objects that contain other objects. Thanks for your help!! –  Ben Baumgold Dec 14 '12 at 5:27
    
Oh how I love stackoverflow and those who contribute in it! I Could have spent a couple of days trying to figure out what's wrong, you just saved me all that time and frustration. Thank you! –  TheZuck Dec 3 '13 at 11:26
    
It would be nice if this behaviour was documented on @PersistenceConstructor –  mR_fr0g Feb 12 at 11:07

You can use some custom converters (and remove @PersistenceConstructor):

// DB => Java
package com.recorder.converters;

public class TestObjectReadConverter implements Converter<DBObject, TestObject> 
{
   public TestObject convert(final DBObject source) {
       return new TestObject((Integer) source.get("m_property"));
   }
}

.

// JAVA => DB
package com.recorder.converters;

public class TestObjectWriteConverter implements Converter<TestObject, DBObject> 
{
    public DBObject convert(final TestObject source) {
        return new BasicDBObjectBuilder("m_property", source.property()).get();
    }
}

Don't forget to declare those (xml config):

<mongo:mapping-converter base-package="com.recorder">
    <mongo:custom-converters>
        <mongo:converter>
             <bean class="com.recorder.converters.TestObjectReadConverter" />
        </mongo:converter>
        <mongo:converter>
             <bean class="com.recorder.converters.TestObjectWriteConverter"/>
        </mongo:converter>
    </mongo:custom-converters>
</mongo:mapping-converter>

see this reference

Side note: this is a work around, I don't think naming convention are meant to be so tight that you need to work around. Perhaps it's time for your group to "rethink" those naming convention (for productivity sake in that case).

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