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I have generally run across two methods, depending on server configuration, of remotely checking the availability of a CDN-hosted script using PHP. One is cURL, the other is fopen. I've combined the two functions I use in their respective cases like so:

function use_cdn(){
   $url = 'http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1/jquery.min.js'; // the URL to check against
   $ret = false;
   if(function_exists('curl_init')) {
      $curl = curl_init($url);
      curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_NOBODY, true);
      $result = curl_exec($curl);
      if (($result !== false) && (curl_getinfo($curl, CURLINFO_HTTP_CODE) == 200)) $ret = true;   
      curl_close($curl);
   }
   else {
      $ret = @fopen($url,'r');
   }
   if($ret) {
      wp_deregister_script('jquery'); // deregisters the default WordPress jQuery
      wp_register_script('jquery', $url); // register the external file
      wp_enqueue_script('jquery'); // enqueue the external file
   }
   else {
      wp_enqueue_script('jquery'); // enqueue the local file
   }
}

...but I'm not looking to reinvent the wheel. Is this a good, solid technique or can anyone offer pointers as to how to simplify/streamline the process?

share|improve this question
    
I would be very worried if the Google CDN went down, the world would end. O.o –  cryptic ツ Dec 12 '12 at 3:39
    
@cryptic I know, but Google doesn't have to go down for its CDN to be unavailable in certain areas/to certain networks/etc. –  Isaac Lubow Dec 12 '12 at 6:16
    
please see my simplified method to do so then. –  cryptic ツ Dec 12 '12 at 6:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using get_headers() we can issue a HEAD request and check the response code to see if the file is available, and also will allow us to see if network or DNS is down since it will cause get_headers() to fail (keep the @ sign to suppress PHP error if domain is not resolvable, which will cause it to return FALSE in that case and thus load local file:

function use_cdn()
{
    $url = 'http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1/jquery.min.js'; // the URL to check against
    $online = FALSE;

    if(function_exists('curl_init')) 
    {
        $curl = curl_init($url);
        curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_NOBODY, TRUE);
        $result = curl_exec($curl);
        if ((FALSE !== $result) && ('200' == curl_getinfo($curl, CURLINFO_HTTP_CODE)))
        {
            $online = TRUE;
        }
        curl_close($curl);
    } 
    else if (ini_get('allow_url_fopen'))
    {
        stream_context_set_default(array('http' => array('method' => 'HEAD'))); // set as HEAD request
        $headers = @get_headers($url, 1); // get HTTP response headers
        if ($headers && FALSE !== strpos($headers[0], '200')) // if get_headers() passed and 200 OK
        {
            $online = TRUE;
        }
    }

    if ($online)
    {
        wp_deregister_script('jquery'); // deregisters the default WordPress jQuery
        wp_register_script('jquery', $url); // register the external file
    }
    wp_enqueue_script('jquery'); // enqueue registered files
}

get_headers() would be faster as it is a build in function, opposed to having to load a PECL extension such as cURL. As for fopen() well the task you need to do is check the response headers, get_headers()'s only use is to do just that, fopen() can't get headers, and cURL has other uses not to mention the unnecessary overhead and don't specialize in getting headers so it would be the most suitable choice to use in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
I like that. Is there any advantage to using get_headers() as opposed to fopen or cURL? Is there a de facto standard? –  Isaac Lubow Dec 12 '12 at 11:47
    
get_headers() would be faster as it is a build in function, opposed to having to load a PECL extension such as cURL. As for fopen() well the task you need to do is check the response headers, get_headers()'s only use is to do just that, fopen() can't get headers, and cURL has other uses not to mention the unnecessary overhead and don't specialize in getting headers so it would be the most suitable choice to use in this case. –  cryptic ツ Dec 12 '12 at 12:10
    
Well, that's great! Accepted. Maybe put a note into your answer that explains those advantages? –  Isaac Lubow Dec 12 '12 at 15:39
    
Interestingly enough, the server I'm working on at the moment doesn't execute get_headers() requests. So if anything, I'm forced to fall back to the two other methods of checking for a 200 response. Guess there isn't a silver bullet for this problem after all. –  Isaac Lubow Dec 13 '12 at 12:58
1  
Well if you really want robust code you would not use cURL either as it can be disabled or not available on hosts as well. What I would do is maybe use all three, in order of most efficient to least efficient and check to see if each is available by using function_exists() for cURL as you did, and checking ini_get('allow_url_fopen') == '1' for fopen() and get_headers(), that way you can fallback to another, while making sure the most efficient methods are tried first. –  cryptic ツ Dec 14 '12 at 8:43

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