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You can't create an instance of an type that contains generic parameters.

However, it isn't abstract or an interface.

I was reading the StructureMap TypeExtensions helpers and I came across:

public static bool IsConcrete(this Type type)
{
    return (!type.IsAbstract && !type.IsInterface);
}

I'm not really happy with the way that's interpreted, because to it seems like if a type is concrete, then it should be possible for there to be an instance of it. For example, I have trouble considering something like typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(typeof(List<>))) to be a concrete type.

I understand that an open generic type in C# and an abstract type in C# are very different in the way that they how they deviate from concretion, but at the same time, there is something fundamentally abstract about both of them. Abstract classes and interface could be interpreted as parameterized if you consider that their parameters are operation implementations. However, this is going a little off topic.

What I really want to know is a way to unify these concepts with consistent semantics that don't feel like a lie where an abomination like List<List<List<>>> can be concrete. Do we have a universal way to describe this distinction?

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1  
You should probably choose a tag to replace with C# (if anything to get more attention). – Paul Bellora Dec 12 '12 at 4:04
    
@PaulBellora - makes sense – smartcaveman Dec 12 '12 at 4:41
1  
"What I really want to know is a way to unify these concepts with consistent semantics that don't feel like a lie where an abomination like List<List<List<>>> can be concrete." -- FWIW, I don't consider that any more of an abonimation than List<T> where T is a static class, which definitely is concrete: you can create such a list, and you can add null to that list. But you're right that List<List<List<>>> isn't concrete by your definition: it cannot be instantiated. – hvd Dec 12 '12 at 12:24
    
@hvd - didn't know that... so i tried..you're right. weird. – smartcaveman Dec 15 '12 at 1:40

I'm not sure if your question is more about the philosophical aspect of parametric vs subtype polymorphism (which I'm not knowledgeable enough in type theory to answer).

I choose to read it in a very practical way as follows, hoping it's what you wanted to know:

given that "concrete" implies "I can create instances of it [*]" and that you can't create an instance of a generic type if it's not parametrized, the given definition of IsConcrete fails to take generic types into account. So, how can you extend IsConcrete in such a way that

  • IsConcrete(typeof(List<>)) is false
  • IsConcrete(typeof(List<int>)) is true
  • IsConcrete(typeof(typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(typeof(List<>)))) is false?

For that you can use Type.ContainsGenericParameters

A quick LinqPad snippet to demonstrate:

var TListGen = typeof(List<>);
var TListInt = typeof(List<int>); // this would be "concrete" in the sense
                                  // that its generic arguments
                                  // are all parametrized
var TTest = typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(typeof(List<>)));                                     


(!TListGen.ContainsGenericParameters).Dump(); // False
(!TListInt.ContainsGenericParameters).Dump(); // True
(!TTest.ContainsGenericParameters).Dump(); // False

* with some gotchas e.g. concrete types that have a private constructor

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I think the following statement is not "completely" correct:

You can't create an instance of an type that contains generic parameters

Generic class is actually a template of a class (not of object). And unless that template is converted to a closed class no instance (object) could be created.

But, because we havent specified type to a generic template it does not define it to be concrete/abstract. We can create instance of a generic type, as long as it is not abstract (or interface)!

Not sure if this helps.

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A generic type is specified (complete) only if the parametric type is specified. Probably you wanted to say

You can't create an instance of an type without specifying generic parameters.

Generic type can easily be concrete. Let's have generic types A and B:

class A<T>          // concrete generic type
{
}

abstract class B<T> // abstract generic type i.e. not concrete
{
}

A<int> a = new A<int>();
// not possible: B<int> b = new B<int>();
bool a1 = typeof(A<>).IsAbstract,       // false
    a2 = typeof(A<int>).IsAbstract,     // false
    b1 = typeof(B<>).IsAbstract,        // true
    b2 = typeof(B<int>).IsAbstract;     // true

In your example any List<T> will be concrete and List<> not - because it isn't really a type, from which you construct instances, it's a generic type definition typeof(List<>).IsGenericTypeDefinition == true.

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I think there's a difference between "can be instantiated" and "concrete".

Is the below class concrete:

class Foo{
   private readonly int number;
   private Foo(int i ){
      number = i;
   }
}

I'd say it is but you can't create an instance of it. So let's extend it:

public Bar{
  class Foo{
     private readonly int number;
     private Foo(int i){
        number = i;
     }
  }

  public static Foo Create(int i){
    return new Foo(i);     
  }
}

but how's that more or less concrete than:

public class Bar {
  class Foo<T>{
     private readonly T obj;
     private Foo(T obj){
          number = i;
     }
  }

  public static Foo<T> Create<T>(T obj){
     return new Foo<T>(obj);     
  }
}

To get an instance of either versions of Foo you write Bar.Create(1) (or passing another argument).

Is any of the functionality missing from an abstract class? it doesn't have to be but it certainly can be so there's something about the functionality of the class we do not know. Is this true for a generic type definition. No it's not. Some of the functionality might be deferred to an object of a generic type but that's different. and not so much different from Eg. using the Strategy pattern:

interface IExecutor{
     void Execute();
}

public class Command{
     IExecutor _e;
     public Command(IExecutor e){
          _e = e;
     }

     public void Do(){
        _e.Execute();
     }
}


public class Command<T> where T : IExecutor{
     public Command(T e){
          _e = e;
     }

     public void Do(){
        _e.Execute();
     }
}

Are any of those two classes more concrete/generic than the other? Is there something you can say about one of them when it comes to the concrete implementation of an algorithm you can't say of the other?

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