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I have a list of key/value pairs which I would like to update via a single SQL statement. The update value is different for each row. it seems fairly trivia to do a dynamic update using values from another table. But I don't have the update to values in a table, and I would prefer not to create a temp table to do so.

I would like to be able to do something like

UPDATE table
SET update_column = IN(value1,value2)
WHERE key_column IN(Key1 , Key2)
AND Criteria_column = 'Criteria'
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How about using a CASE/IIF stateemnt (depending on which RDBMS you are using)? –  astander Dec 12 '12 at 4:08
    
Where are your key value pairs stored? –  Dale M Dec 12 '12 at 4:09
    
I have a list exported into excel from an erp applicaton –  Pynner Dec 12 '12 at 4:40
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1 Answer

In PostgreSQL, and probably in other databases, you can (somewhat clumsily) build up a "table" in-place using UNION ALL:

UPDATE table
SET update_column = temp.value
FROM (
    SELECT 'foo' AS id, 'bar' AS value
      UNION ALL
    SELECT 'baz' AS id, 'qux' AS value
      UNION ALL
    SELECT 'et' AS id, 'cetera' AS value
) temp
WHERE key_column = temp.id
AND Criteria_column = 'Criteria';

In more recent versions of PostgreSQL, the syntax for building an in-place table has been improved:

UPDATE table
SET update_column = temp.value
FROM (
    VALUES ('foo', 'bar'), ('baz', 'qux'), ('et', 'cetera')
) temp (id, value)
WHERE key_column = temp.id
AND Criteria_column = 'Criteria';
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thanks for that, I should have said I am using oracle.... this syntax doesn't seem to work for oracle. –  Pynner Dec 12 '12 at 5:01
    
@Pynner: I see. Are you able to concatenate queries together using UNION or UNION ALL? I think that's standard SQL... If not, there might be a different syntax for it in Oracle. Also it might be that you just need to add AS before the table name temp. But it might be that allowing FROM in an UPDATE is a PostgreSQL extension... in that case, there must be some other syntax for pulling in other tables (e.g. using a subselect, e.g. SET update_column = (SELECT ...)), because I can't believe Oracle forbids any kind of table join in an UPDATE -- it would be too limiting. –  j_random_hacker Dec 12 '12 at 5:40
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