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In java Generics, is there a way to tell that a certain type is not a subclass or super class of another class ? I mean we can use Upper and Lower bounding on some relationship hierarchy. But how can we do it in the other way such that <? isNotASubTypeOf A>.

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closed as not a real question by EJP, Bohemian, durron597, evilone, Graviton Dec 18 '12 at 7:25

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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can you better clarify you question? Maybe some practical example would help. –  Gabriele Petronella Dec 12 '12 at 4:59
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such that...?? Common we're listening. –  Rohit Jain Dec 12 '12 at 5:07
    
Why would you want to? Unless your inheritance hierarchy goes ten deep - then you may want to use interfaces instead at that point. –  Makoto Dec 12 '12 at 5:13
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This is a moronic thing to desire –  Bohemian Dec 12 '12 at 6:40
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Generics are not for arbitrary constraints. Generics are only for eliminating certain casts that it can prove is safe. If your restriction doesn't do that, then generics is not for it. –  newacct Dec 12 '12 at 7:43
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2 Answers 2

so you want

<T !extends Foo> 

nope.... can't do that

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Though this does not answer your question, though in such cases I think pattern Matching in Scala is extremely useful. You can he something like this.

typeVariable match {
case A => //do whatever
case B => //do whatever
case _ => //do whatever
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