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If you call this first method, 'CreateLotsOfAlphas', what is it supposed to print? I'm just having trouble following the flow of the program. I thought it would print aabbc, but for some reason it actually prints bacbc.

My reasoning is that newA1.y is just the input, a, at first due to the null. a is saved into this.y, so newA2.y is (a + b) with b saved into this.y, then newA3.y is (b + c) to give aabbc.

Am I looking at this wrong or something?

public void CreateLotsOfAlphas() {
    Alpha newA1 = new Alpha(1.0, "a", null); 
    Alpha newA2 = new Alpha(2.0, "b", newA1); 
    Alpha newA3 = new Alpha(3.0, "c", newA2);
    System.out.println(newA1.y + newA2.y + newA3.y);
}

These two methods are in two different classes by the way.

public Alpha(double x, String y, Alpha oldAlpha) { 
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
    w = (int) x;
    if (oldAlpha != null) { 
        oldAlpha.y = y + oldAlpha.y;
    } 
}
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1  
what is w? does it matter? –  Preet Sangha Dec 12 '12 at 5:25
    
No, doesn't matter for this. –  Adam Dec 12 '12 at 5:31
1  
so it's NOT a SSCCE sigh –  vaxquis Dec 12 '12 at 5:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
Alpha newA1 = new Alpha(1.0, "a", null);
// oldAlpha == null so we only newA1.y = "a"
Alpha newA2 = new Alpha(2.0, "b", newA1);
// oldAlpha is newA1 => newA1.y = "b"+"a"; newA2.y = "b"
Alpha newA3 = new Alpha(3.0, "c", newA2);
// oldAlpha is newA2 => newA2.y = "c"+"b", newA3.y = "c"; newA1.y = "ba" (still)
System.out.println(newA1.y + newA2.y + newA3.y);
// newA1.y = "ba", newA2.y = "cb", newA3.y = "c"

... clear enough?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, very, thank you. –  Adam Dec 12 '12 at 5:42

at the time of print statement

newA3.y = 'c'
newA2.y = 'cb'
newA1.y = 'ba'
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it's because of null in your first call to the constructor it's not able to enter into this if condition or if condition doesn't execute

if (oldAlpha != null) { 
        oldAlpha.y = y + oldAlpha.y;
    } 
share|improve this answer

Only if old Alpha is NOT null you actually print something.

Alpha newA1 = new Alpha(1.0, "a", null);  //no old Alpha
Alpha newA2 = new Alpha(2.0, "b", newA1); // newA1.y = bc as newA1 is Old alpha
Alpha newA3 = new Alpha(3.0, "c", newA2); // newA2.y = cb as newA2 is Old alpha

SO:

 System.out.println(
                newA1.y //bc as written above
              + newA2.y //cb as written above
              + newA3.y //only c as newA3 is never oldAlpha so it contains only self value
              ); 

I hope that is clear enough :).

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Well, we have newA2.y.equals("b"), and since the third argument to newA1's constructor is null, the if block does not execute.

However, when newA2 is created, newA1.y is changed from "a" to newA2.y + newA1.y, ie "ba". I'll let you figure out where the remainder of the output comes from.

This is why things can be confusing if you change the state of an object within the constructor of another object (and this makes things extremely not thread safe). The entire design is a bit of a code smell, in that you're coupling your Alpha objects.

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Downvoter: Care to explain? –  Jack Maney Dec 15 '12 at 23:29

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